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An update of genetic basis of PCOS pathogenesis

Overview of attention for article published in Archives of Endocrinology and Metabolism, June 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#29 of 237)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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64 Dimensions

Readers on

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222 Mendeley
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Title
An update of genetic basis of PCOS pathogenesis
Published in
Archives of Endocrinology and Metabolism, June 2018
DOI 10.20945/2359-3997000000049
Pubmed ID
Authors

Raiane P. Crespo, Tania A. S. S. Bachega, Berenice B. Mendonça, Larissa G. Gomes

Abstract

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common and complex endocrine disorder that affects 5-20% of reproductive age women. PCOS clinical symptoms include hirsutism, menstrual dysfunction, infertility, obesity and metabolic syndrome. There is a wide heterogeneity in clinical manifestations and metabolic complications. The pathogenesis of PCOS is not fully elucidated, but four aspects seem to contribute to the syndrome to different degrees: increased ovarian and/or adrenal androgen secretion, partial folliculogenesis arrest, insulin resistance and neuroendocrine axis dysfunction. A definitive etiology remains to be elucidated, but PCOS has a strong heritable component indicated by familial clustering and twin studies. Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have identified several new risk loci and candidate genes for PCOS. Despite these findings, the association studies have explained less than 10% of heritability. Therefore, we could speculate that different phenotypes and subphenotypes are caused by rare private genetic variants. Modern genetic studies, such as whole exome and genome sequencing, will help to clarify the contribution of these rare genetic variants on different PCOS phenotypes. Arch Endocrinol Metab. 2018;62(3):352-61.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 222 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 222 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 35 16%
Student > Bachelor 34 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 12%
Researcher 22 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 13 6%
Other 23 10%
Unknown 69 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 54 24%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 41 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 12 5%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 11 5%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 5%
Other 17 8%
Unknown 77 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 August 2021.
All research outputs
#5,266,193
of 21,829,456 outputs
Outputs from Archives of Endocrinology and Metabolism
#29
of 237 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#86,791
of 296,979 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Archives of Endocrinology and Metabolism
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,829,456 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 237 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 296,979 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them