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DNMT3A and TET1 cooperate to regulate promoter epigenetic landscapes in mouse embryonic stem cells

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Biology (Online Edition), July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 blogs
twitter
22 tweeters
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1 research highlight platform

Citations

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43 Dimensions

Readers on

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121 Mendeley
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Title
DNMT3A and TET1 cooperate to regulate promoter epigenetic landscapes in mouse embryonic stem cells
Published in
Genome Biology (Online Edition), July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13059-018-1464-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tianpeng Gu, Xueqiu Lin, Sean M. Cullen, Min Luo, Mira Jeong, Marcos Estecio, Jianjun Shen, Swanand Hardikar, Deqiang Sun, Jianzhong Su, Danielle Rux, Anna Guzman, Minjung Lee, Lei Stanley Qi, Jia-Jia Chen, Michael Kyba, Yun Huang, Taiping Chen, Wei Li, Margaret A. Goodell

Abstract

DNA methylation is a heritable epigenetic mark, enabling stable but reversible gene repression. In mammalian cells, DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) are responsible for modifying cytosine to 5-methylcytosine (5mC), which can be further oxidized by the TET dioxygenases to ultimately cause DNA demethylation. However, the genome-wide cooperation and functions of these two families of proteins, especially at large under-methylated regions, called canyons, remain largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that DNMT3A and TET1 function in a complementary and competitive manner in mouse embryonic stem cells to mediate proper epigenetic landscapes and gene expression. The longer isoform of DNMT3A, DNMT3A1, exhibits significant enrichment at distal promoters and canyon edges, but is excluded from proximal promoters and canyons where TET1 shows prominent binding. Deletion of Tet1 increases DNMT3A1 binding capacity at and around genes with wild-type TET1 binding. However, deletion of Dnmt3a has a minor effect on TET1 binding on chromatin, indicating that TET1 may limit DNA methylation partially by protecting its targets from DNMT3A and establishing boundaries for DNA methylation. Local CpG density may determine their complementary binding patterns and therefore that the methylation landscape is encoded in the DNA sequence. Furthermore, DNMT3A and TET1 impact histone modifications which in turn regulate gene expression. In particular, they regulate Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated H3K27me3 enrichment to constrain gene expression from bivalent promoters. We conclude that DNMT3A and TET1 regulate the epigenome and gene expression at specific targets via their functional interplay.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 22 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 121 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 121 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 26%
Researcher 29 24%
Student > Master 20 17%
Student > Bachelor 12 10%
Other 7 6%
Other 10 8%
Unknown 12 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 60 50%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 21%
Computer Science 4 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 3%
Neuroscience 3 2%
Other 10 8%
Unknown 15 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 26. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 February 2020.
All research outputs
#831,706
of 15,922,938 outputs
Outputs from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#808
of 3,414 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,391
of 276,545 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Biology (Online Edition)
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,938 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,414 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,545 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them