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Effects of Natural Organic Matter Properties on the Dissolution Kinetics of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Science & Technology, September 2015
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (51st percentile)
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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75 Dimensions

Readers on

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98 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of Natural Organic Matter Properties on the Dissolution Kinetics of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles
Published in
Environmental Science & Technology, September 2015
DOI 10.1021/acs.est.5b02406
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chuanjia Jiang, George R. Aiken, Heileen Hsu-Kim

Abstract

The dissolution of zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) is a key step controlling their environmental fate, bioavailability, and toxicity. Rates of dissolution often depend upon factors such as interactions of NPs with natural organic matter (NOM). We examined the effects of 16 different NOM isolates on the dissolution kinetics of ZnO NPs in buffered potassium chloride solution using anodic stripping voltammetry to directly measure dissolved zinc concentrations. The observed dissolution rate constants (kobs) and dissolved zinc concentrations at equilibrium increased linearly with NOM concentration (from 0 to 40 mg-C L(-1)) for Suwannee River humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. When dissolution rates were compared for the 16 NOM isolates, kobs was positively correlated with certain properties of NOM, including specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA), aromatic and carbonyl carbon contents, and molecular weight. Dissolution rate constants were negatively correlated to hydrogen/carbon ratio and aliphatic carbon content. The observed correlations indicate that aromatic carbon content is a key factor in determining the rate of NOM-promoted dissolution of ZnO NPs. The findings of this study facilitate a better understanding of the fate of ZnO NPs in organic-rich aquatic environments and highlight SUVA as a facile and useful indicator of NOM interactions with metal-based nanoparticles.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 98 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Unknown 97 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 42 43%
Student > Master 14 14%
Researcher 8 8%
Student > Bachelor 7 7%
Professor > Associate Professor 7 7%
Other 13 13%
Unknown 7 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 30 31%
Chemistry 18 18%
Engineering 12 12%
Materials Science 6 6%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 6 6%
Other 10 10%
Unknown 16 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 September 2015.
All research outputs
#7,315,482
of 12,313,065 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Science & Technology
#9,706
of 12,334 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#116,880
of 244,968 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Science & Technology
#145
of 261 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,313,065 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,334 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.1. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 244,968 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 261 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.