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Cross-Seasonal Patterns of Avian Influenza Virus in Breeding and Wintering Migratory Birds: A Flyway Perspective

Overview of attention for article published in Vector Borne & Zoonotic Diseases, March 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (82nd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 policy sources
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

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36 Dimensions

Readers on

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73 Mendeley
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Title
Cross-Seasonal Patterns of Avian Influenza Virus in Breeding and Wintering Migratory Birds: A Flyway Perspective
Published in
Vector Borne & Zoonotic Diseases, March 2012
DOI 10.1089/vbz.2010.0246
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nichola J. Hill, John Y. Takekawa, Carol J. Cardona, Brandt W. Meixell, Joshua T. Ackerman, Jonathan A. Runstadler, Walter M. Boyce

Abstract

The spread of avian influenza viruses (AIV) in nature is intrinsically linked with the movements of wild birds. Wild birds are the reservoirs for the virus and their migration may facilitate the circulation of AIV between breeding and wintering areas. This cycle of dispersal has become widely accepted; however, there are few AIV studies that present cross-seasonal information. A flyway perspective is critical for understanding how wild birds contribute to the persistence of AIV over large spatial and temporal scales, with implications for how to focus surveillance efforts and identify risks to public health. This study characterized spatio-temporal infection patterns in 10,389 waterfowl at two important locations within the Pacific Flyway--breeding sites in Interior Alaska and wintering sites in California's Central Valley during 2007-2009. Among the dabbling ducks sampled, the northern shoveler (Anas clypeata) had the highest prevalence of AIV at both breeding (32.2%) and wintering (5.2%) locations. This is in contrast to surveillance studies conducted in other flyways that have identified the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) and northern pintail (Anas acuta) as hosts with the highest prevalence. A higher diversity of AIV subtypes was apparent at wintering (n=42) compared with breeding sites (n=17), with evidence of mixed infections at both locations. Our study suggests that wintering sites may act as an important mixing bowl for transmission among waterfowl in a flyway, creating opportunities for the reassortment of the virus. Our findings shed light on how the dynamics of AIV infection of wild bird populations can vary between the two ends of a migratory flyway.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 1%
Réunion 1 1%
Denmark 1 1%
Korea, Republic of 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 68 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 25 34%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 21%
Student > Master 6 8%
Other 5 7%
Student > Bachelor 3 4%
Other 11 15%
Unknown 8 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 33 45%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 9 12%
Environmental Science 7 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 5%
Other 6 8%
Unknown 9 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 December 2018.
All research outputs
#2,664,226
of 15,479,201 outputs
Outputs from Vector Borne & Zoonotic Diseases
#134
of 1,129 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#19,143
of 115,275 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Vector Borne & Zoonotic Diseases
#2
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,479,201 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 81st percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,129 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 115,275 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.