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Emergence and predominance of norovirus GII.17 in Huzhou, China, 2014–2015

Overview of attention for article published in Virology Journal, September 2015
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Title
Emergence and predominance of norovirus GII.17 in Huzhou, China, 2014–2015
Published in
Virology Journal, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12985-015-0370-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jiankang Han, Lei Ji, Yuehua Shen, Xiaofang Wu, Deshun Xu, Liping Chen

Abstract

Norovirus (NoV) has been recognized as the leading cause of both outbreaks and sporadic cases of acute gastroenteritis in children and adults worldwide. Stool samples collected from outpatients with clinical symptoms of acute gastroenteritis in all age groups at the First People's Hospital in Huzhou, Huzhou, China between March 2014 and February 2015 were analyzed to gain insight into the epidemiology and genetic variation in NoV strains circulating in China. Real-time RT-PCR (qPCR) was performed for Norovirus detection. RT-PCR were used for genomic amplification and sequencing. Genogroup and genotype were assigned using the NoV Noronet typing tool and the strains were named according to the time of isolation. The phylogenetic analysis was conducted using MEGA 5. Of the 809 specimens, 193 (23.9 %) were positive for NoV, with GII.4 and GII.17 the most commonly identified strains. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed the presence of five recombinant strains in Huzhou. Recombinants GII.P13/GII.17 and GII.P12/GII.4 were newly detected in China. The GII.P13/GII.17 recombinant was first identified in October 2014 and steadily replaced GII.Pe/GII.4 (GII.4 Sydney 2012) as the predominant circulating NoV genotype. This is the first report of the detection of GII.17 in the Huzhou area and of a NoV genotype being detected in greater numbers than GII.4. Furthermore, our results indicated that following the emergence of GII.17 in October 2014, it steadily replaced the previous circulating GII.4 Sydney2012 strain, which was the dominant circulating genotype for the past 2 years. As norovirus are the important cause of nonbacterial gastroenteritis, continuous and comprehensive study of the norovirus strains involved in large and cost-effective acute gastroenteritis would help understanding the molecular epidemiology of norovirus infections and development of improved prevention and control measures.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 1 4%
Unknown 27 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 25%
Student > Bachelor 5 18%
Student > Postgraduate 3 11%
Student > Master 2 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Other 7 25%
Unknown 2 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 39%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 14%
Psychology 2 7%
Environmental Science 1 4%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 2 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 September 2015.
All research outputs
#5,395,518
of 6,334,804 outputs
Outputs from Virology Journal
#1,309
of 1,453 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#156,189
of 195,335 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Virology Journal
#62
of 64 outputs
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