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A study of virulence and antimicrobial resistance pattern in diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli isolated from diarrhoeal stool specimens from children and adults in a tertiary hospital, Puducherry, India

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition, July 2018
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Title
A study of virulence and antimicrobial resistance pattern in diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli isolated from diarrhoeal stool specimens from children and adults in a tertiary hospital, Puducherry, India
Published in
Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s41043-018-0147-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mailan Natarajan, Deepika Kumar, Jharna Mandal, Niranjan Biswal, Selvaraj Stephen

Abstract

Emergence of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and hybrid E. coli (harboring genes of more than one DEC pathotypes) strains have complicated the issue of growing antibiotic resistance in diarrhoeagenic Escherichia coli (DEC). This ongoing evolution occurs in nature predominantly via horizontal gene transfers involving the mobile genetic elements like integrons notably class 1 integron. This study was undertaken to determine the virulence pattern and antibiotic resistance among the circulating DEC strains in a tertiary care center in south of India. Diarrhoeal stool specimens were obtained from 120 children (< 5 years) and 100 adults (> 18 years), subjected to culture and isolation of diarrhoeal pathogens. Conventional PCR was performed to detect 10 virulence and 27 antimicrobial resistance (AMR) genes among the E. coli isolated. DEC infection was observed in 45 (37.5%) children and 18 (18%) adults, among which [18 (40%), 10 (10%)] atypical EPEC was most commonly detected followed by [6 (13.3%), 4 (4%)] ETEC, [5 (11.1%) 2 (2%)] EAEC, [(3 (6.6%), 0 (0%)] EIEC, [3 (6.6%), 0 (0%] typical EPEC, and [4 (8.8%), 1 (1%)] STEC, and no NTEC and CDEC was detected. DEC co-infection in 3 (6.6%) children, and 1(1%) adult and sole hybrid DEC infection in 3 (6.6%) children was detected. The distribution of sulphonamide resistance genes (sulI, sulII, and sulIII were 83.3 and 21%, 60.41 and 42.1%, and 12.5 and 26.3%, respectively) and class 1 integron (int1) genes (41.6 and 26.31%) was higher in DEC strains isolated from children and adults, respectively. Other AMR genes detected were qnrS, qnrB, aac(6')Ib-cr, dhfr1, aadB, aac(3)-IV, tetA, tetB, tetD, catI, blaCTX, blaSHV, and blaTEM. None harbored qnrA, qnrC, qepA, tetE, tetC, tetY, ermA, mcr1, int2, and int3 genes. Atypical EPEC was a primary etiological agent of diarrhea in children and adults among the DEC pathotypes. Detection of high numbers of AMR genes and class 1 integron genes indicate the importance of mobile genetic elements in spreading of multidrug resistance genes among these strains.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 17%
Student > Master 6 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 14%
Lecturer 3 8%
Researcher 2 6%
Other 6 17%
Unknown 8 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 6 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 14%
Social Sciences 2 6%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 6%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 10 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 July 2018.
All research outputs
#11,741,175
of 13,226,211 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition
#233
of 290 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#230,769
of 266,663 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Health, Population, & Nutrition
#3
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,226,211 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 290 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,663 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.