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Alleviating Neuropathic Pain Mechanical Allodynia by Increasing Cdh1 in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Pain, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

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8 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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13 Mendeley
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Title
Alleviating Neuropathic Pain Mechanical Allodynia by Increasing Cdh1 in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex
Published in
Molecular Pain, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12990-015-0058-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Wei Tan, Wen-Long Yao, Rong Hu, You-You Lv, Li Wan, Chuan-Han Zhang, Chang Zhu

Abstract

Plastic changes in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) are critical in the pathogenesis of pain hypersensitivity caused by injury to peripheral nerves. Cdh1, a co-activator subunit of anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) regulates synaptic differentiation and transmission. Based on this, we hypothesised that the APC/C-Cdh1 played an important role in long-term plastic changes induced by neuropathic pain in ACC. We employed spared nerve injury (SNI) model in rat and found Cdh1 protein level in the ACC was down-regulated 3, 7 and 14 days after SNI surgery. We detected increase in c-Fos expression, numerical increase of organelles, swollen myelinated fibre and axon collapse of neuronal cells in the ACC of SNI rat. Additionally, AMPA receptor GluR1 subunit protein level was up-regulated on the membrane through a pathway that involves EphA4 mediated by APC/C-Cdh1, 3 and 7 days after SNI surgery. To confirm the effect of Cdh1 in neuropathic pain, Cdh1-expressing lentivirus was injected into the ACC of SNI rat. Intra-ACC treatment with Cdh1-expressing lentivirus vectors elevated Cdh1 levels, erased synaptic strengthening, as well as alleviating established mechanical allodynia in SNI rats. We also found Cdh1-expressing lentivirus normalised SNI-induced redistribution of AMPA receptor GluR1 subunit in ACC by regulating AMPA receptor trafficking. These results provide evidence that Cdh1 in ACC synapses may offer a novel therapeutic strategy for treating chronic neuropathic pain.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 8%
Unknown 12 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 23%
Student > Bachelor 1 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Unknown 3 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 31%
Neuroscience 3 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 8%
Psychology 1 8%
Engineering 1 8%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 3 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 October 2015.
All research outputs
#3,695,071
of 14,030,460 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Pain
#89
of 506 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,002
of 241,335 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Pain
#4
of 44 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,030,460 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 506 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 241,335 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 44 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.