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Whole-brain activity mapping onto a zebrafish brain atlas

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Methods, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
41 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
2 Google+ users
f1000
1 research highlight platform

Citations

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123 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
357 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Whole-brain activity mapping onto a zebrafish brain atlas
Published in
Nature Methods, September 2015
DOI 10.1038/nmeth.3581
Pubmed ID
Authors

Owen Randlett, Caroline L Wee, Eva A Naumann, Onyeka Nnaemeka, David Schoppik, James E Fitzgerald, Ruben Portugues, Alix M B Lacoste, Clemens Riegler, Florian Engert, Alexander F Schier

Abstract

In order to localize the neural circuits involved in generating behaviors, it is necessary to assign activity onto anatomical maps of the nervous system. Using brain registration across hundreds of larval zebrafish, we have built an expandable open source atlas containing molecular labels and anatomical region definitions, the Z-Brain. Using this platform and immunohistochemical detection of phosphorylated-Extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK/MAPK) as a readout of neural activity, we have developed a system to create and contextualize whole brain maps of stimulus- and behavior-dependent neural activity. This MAP-Mapping (Mitogen Activated Protein kinase - Mapping) assay is technically simple, fast, inexpensive, and data analysis is completely automated. Since MAP-Mapping is performed on fish that are freely swimming, it is applicable to nearly any stimulus or behavior. We demonstrate the utility of our high-throughput approach using hunting/feeding, pharmacological, visual and noxious stimuli. The resultant maps outline hundreds of areas associated with behaviors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 41 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 357 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 4 1%
United States 4 1%
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 340 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 96 27%
Researcher 74 21%
Student > Bachelor 42 12%
Student > Master 39 11%
Unspecified 35 10%
Other 71 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 128 36%
Neuroscience 95 27%
Unspecified 45 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 28 8%
Engineering 17 5%
Other 44 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 28. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 October 2017.
All research outputs
#570,566
of 13,230,555 outputs
Outputs from Nature Methods
#821
of 3,757 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,787
of 240,468 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Methods
#28
of 112 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,230,555 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,757 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,468 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 112 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.