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Host-linked soil viral ecology along a permafrost thaw gradient

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Microbiology, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
4 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
176 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
124 Mendeley
Title
Host-linked soil viral ecology along a permafrost thaw gradient
Published in
Nature Microbiology, July 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41564-018-0190-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Joanne B. Emerson, Simon Roux, Jennifer R. Brum, Benjamin Bolduc, Ben J. Woodcroft, Ho Bin Jang, Caitlin M. Singleton, Lindsey M. Solden, Adrian E. Naas, Joel A. Boyd, Suzanne B. Hodgkins, Rachel M. Wilson, Gareth Trubl, Changsheng Li, Steve Frolking, Phillip B. Pope, Kelly C. Wrighton, Patrick M. Crill, Jeffrey P. Chanton, Scott R. Saleska, Gene W. Tyson, Virginia I. Rich, Matthew B. Sullivan

Abstract

Climate change threatens to release abundant carbon that is sequestered at high latitudes, but the constraints on microbial metabolisms that mediate the release of methane and carbon dioxide are poorly understood1-7. The role of viruses, which are known to affect microbial dynamics, metabolism and biogeochemistry in the oceans8-10, remains largely unexplored in soil. Here, we aimed to investigate how viruses influence microbial ecology and carbon metabolism in peatland soils along a permafrost thaw gradient in Sweden. We recovered 1,907 viral populations (genomes and large genome fragments) from 197 bulk soil and size-fractionated metagenomes, 58% of which were detected in metatranscriptomes and presumed to be active. In silico predictions linked 35% of the viruses to microbial host populations, highlighting likely viral predators of key carbon-cycling microorganisms, including methanogens and methanotrophs. Lineage-specific virus/host ratios varied, suggesting that viral infection dynamics may differentially impact microbial responses to a changing climate. Virus-encoded glycoside hydrolases, including an endomannanase with confirmed functional activity, indicated that viruses influence complex carbon degradation and that viral abundances were significant predictors of methane dynamics. These findings suggest that viruses may impact ecosystem function in climate-critical, terrestrial habitats and identify multiple potential viral contributions to soil carbon cycling.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 176 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 124 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 124 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 39 31%
Researcher 23 19%
Student > Bachelor 14 11%
Unspecified 14 11%
Student > Master 13 10%
Other 21 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 44 35%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 26 21%
Unspecified 21 17%
Environmental Science 16 13%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 7 6%
Other 10 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 143. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 November 2018.
All research outputs
#88,614
of 12,477,256 outputs
Outputs from Nature Microbiology
#91
of 781 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,439
of 266,434 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Microbiology
#11
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,477,256 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 781 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 68.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,434 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.