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Juvenile stress induces behavioral change and affects perineuronal net formation in juvenile mice

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neuroscience, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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7 Dimensions

Readers on

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54 Mendeley
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Title
Juvenile stress induces behavioral change and affects perineuronal net formation in juvenile mice
Published in
BMC Neuroscience, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12868-018-0442-z
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hiroshi Ueno, Shunsuke Suemitsu, Shinji Murakami, Naoya Kitamura, Kenta Wani, Yosuke Matsumoto, Motoi Okamoto, Shozo Aoki, Takeshi Ishihara

Abstract

Many neuropsychiatric disorders develop in early life. Although the mechanisms involved have not been elucidated, it is possible that functional abnormalities of parvalbumin-positive interneurons (PV neurons) are present. Several previous studies have shown that juvenile stress is implicated in the development of neuropsychiatric disorders. We aimed to clarify the effects of juvenile stress on behavior and on the central nervous system. We investigated behavioral abnormalities of chronically-stressed mice during juvenilehood and the effect of juvenile stress on PV neurons and WFA-positive perineuronal nets (PNNs), which are associated with vulnerability and plasticity in the mouse brain. Due to juvenile stress, mice showed neurodevelopmental disorder-like behavior. Juvenile stressed mice did not show depressive-like behaviors, but on the contrary, they showed increased activity and decreased anxiety-like behavior. In the central nervous system of juvenile stressed mice, the fluorescence intensity of WFA-positive PNNs decreased, which may signify increased vulnerability. This study suggested that juvenile stressed mice showed behavioral abnormalities, resembling those seen in neuropsychiatric disorders, and increased brain vulnerability.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 20%
Student > Master 10 19%
Student > Bachelor 9 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 11%
Researcher 5 9%
Other 6 11%
Unknown 7 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 22 41%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 9%
Psychology 4 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 4%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 11 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 July 2018.
All research outputs
#7,440,477
of 13,801,769 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neuroscience
#422
of 1,050 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#123,451
of 269,293 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neuroscience
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,801,769 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,050 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 269,293 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them