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Effects of Exercise on Sport Concussion Assessment Tool-Third Edition Performance in Women

Overview of attention for article published in Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, July 2018
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

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1 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of Exercise on Sport Concussion Assessment Tool-Third Edition Performance in Women
Published in
Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, July 2018
DOI 10.1097/jsm.0000000000000605
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jean-Paul Chung Pin Yong, Jin H. Lee, David R. Howell, William P. Meehan, Grant L. Iverson, Andrew J. Gardner

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of a brief exercise protocol on Sport Concussion Assessment Tool-Third Edition (SCAT3) performance in amateur women athletes. Cross-over repeated-measures design. Off-season, uninjured community amateur athletes. We examined 87 amateur women athlete volunteers (age = 29.9, SD = 6.9 years). Participants were assessed using the SCAT3 under 2 conditions: at rest and after a 5-minute physical exertion protocol, completed in a counterbalanced order. Participants' performance on the various components of the SCAT3 under the 2 conditions: at rest and after a 5-minute physical exertion protocol. No significant differences were detected between at-rest and postexercise conditions for the balance, orientation, or cognitive components of the SCAT3. There were no significant differences in the proportion of participants who endorsed specific symptoms at rest compared with the postexercise condition (P > 0.05). However, women athletes who rated their exertion after exercise as "hard" or greater (Borg scale rating 13-20) reported significantly greater blurred vision (M = 0.25, SD = 0.62 vs M = 0.00, SD = 0.00; P = 0.006) and fatigue/low energy (M = 1.38, SD = 1.17 vs M = 0.66, SD = 0.91; P = 0.002) symptoms after exercise than those who rated their exertion as "light" or lower (Borg scale rating 6-12). In this study of women athletes, a brief bout of exercise did not seem to adversely affect SCAT3 performance and had only small effects on self-reported symptoms. There were differences in symptom reporting, however, in the subgroup of women who rated their exertion levels as "hard" or greater; they reported more blurred vision and fatigue/low energy.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 1 Mendeley reader of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 1 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 1 100%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 1 100%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 July 2018.
All research outputs
#3,428,596
of 12,384,948 outputs
Outputs from Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine
#760
of 1,362 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#95,590
of 265,004 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine
#33
of 50 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,384,948 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 72nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,362 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.4. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,004 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 50 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.