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Community-based malaria control in southern Malawi: a description of experimental interventions of community workshops, house improvement and larval source management

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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71 Mendeley
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Title
Community-based malaria control in southern Malawi: a description of experimental interventions of community workshops, house improvement and larval source management
Published in
Malaria Journal, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12936-018-2415-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Henk van den Berg, Michèle van Vugt, Alinune N. Kabaghe, Mackenzie Nkalapa, Rowlands Kaotcha, Zinenani Truwah, Tumaini Malenga, Asante Kadama, Saidon Banda, Tinashe Tizifa, Steven Gowelo, Monicah M. Mburu, Kamija S. Phiri, Willem Takken, Robert S. McCann

Abstract

Increased engagement of communities has been emphasized in global plans for malaria control and elimination. Three interventions to reinforce and complement national malaria control recommendations were developed and applied within the context of a broad-based development initiative, targeting a rural population surrounding a wildlife reserve. The interventions, which were part of a 2-year research trial, and assigned to the village level, were implemented through trained local volunteers, or 'health animators', who educated the community and facilitated collective action. Community workshops on malaria were designed to increase uptake of national recommendations; a manual was developed, and training of health animators conducted, with educational content and analytical tools for a series of fortnightly community workshops in annual cycles at village level. The roll-back malaria principle of diagnosis, treatment and use of long-lasting insecticidal nets was a central component of the workshops. Structural house improvement to reduce entry of malaria vectors consisted of targeted activities in selected villages to mobilize the community into voluntarily closing the eaves and screening the windows of their houses; the project provided wire mesh for screening. Corrective measures were introduced to respond to field challenges. Committees were established at village level to coordinate the house improvement activities. Larval source management (LSM) in selected villages consisted of two parts: one on removal of standing water bodies by the community at large; and one on larviciding with bacterial insecticide Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis by trained village committees. Community workshops on malaria were implemented as 'core intervention' in all villages. House improvement and LSM were implemented in addition to community workshops on malaria in selected villages. Three novel interventions for community mobilization on malaria prevention and control were described. The interventions comprised local organizational structure, education and collective action, and incorporated elements of problem identification, planning and evaluation. These methods could be applicable to other countries and settings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 71 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 71 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 19 27%
Researcher 11 15%
Student > Postgraduate 8 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 6%
Other 8 11%
Unknown 14 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 6%
Social Sciences 4 6%
Other 11 15%
Unknown 16 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 November 2018.
All research outputs
#4,187,436
of 15,355,582 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#1,338
of 4,371 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#93,582
of 275,461 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,355,582 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,371 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,461 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them