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The Opioid Crisis in Black Communities

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, January 2021
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#10 of 977)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
132 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
48 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
108 Mendeley
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Title
The Opioid Crisis in Black Communities
Published in
Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics, January 2021
DOI 10.1177/1073110518782949
Pubmed ID
Authors

Keturah James, Ayana Jordan

Abstract

While much of the social and political attention surrounding the nationwide opioid epidemic has focused on the dramatic increase in overdose deaths among white, middle-class, suburban and rural users, the impact of the epidemic in Black communities has largely been unrecognized. Though rates of opioid use at the national scale are higher for whites than they are for Blacks, rates of increase in opioid deaths have been rising more steeply among Blacks (43%) than whites (22%) over the last five years. Moreover, the rate of opioid overdose deaths among Blacks already exceeds that of whites in several states. The lack of discussion of Black overdose deaths in the national opioid discourse further marginalizes Black people, and is highly consistent with a history of framing the addictions of people of color as deserving of criminal punishment, rather than worthy of medical treatment. This article argues that, because racial inequalities are embedded in American popular and political cultures as well as in medicine, the federal and state governments should develop more culturally targeted programs to benefit Black communities in the opioid crisis. Such programs include the use of faith-based organizations to deliver substance use prevention and treatment services, the inclusion of racial impact assessments in the implementation of drug policy proposals, and the formal consideration of Black people's interaction with the criminal justice system in designing treatment options.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 132 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 108 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 108 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 15%
Researcher 13 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 9 8%
Student > Bachelor 8 7%
Other 19 18%
Unknown 26 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 25 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 10%
Psychology 11 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 8%
Computer Science 3 3%
Other 16 15%
Unknown 33 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 123. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 January 2021.
All research outputs
#183,031
of 16,657,433 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics
#10
of 977 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,949
of 280,098 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,657,433 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 977 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 280,098 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them