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Antibody blockade of IL-15 signaling has the potential to durably reverse vitiligo

Overview of attention for article published in Science Translational Medicine, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
13 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
56 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
41 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Antibody blockade of IL-15 signaling has the potential to durably reverse vitiligo
Published in
Science Translational Medicine, July 2018
DOI 10.1126/scitranslmed.aam7710
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jillian M. Richmond, James P. Strassner, Lucio Zapata, Madhuri Garg, Rebecca L. Riding, Maggi A. Refat, Xueli Fan, Vincent Azzolino, Andrea Tovar-Garza, Naoya Tsurushita, Amit G. Pandya, J. Yun Tso, John E. Harris

Abstract

Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease of the skin mediated by CD8+ T cells that kill melanocytes and create white spots. Skin lesions in vitiligo frequently return after discontinuing conventional treatments, supporting the hypothesis that autoimmune memory is formed at these locations. We found that lesional T cells in mice and humans with vitiligo display a resident memory (TRM) phenotype, similar to those that provide rapid, localized protection against reinfection from skin and mucosal-tropic viruses. Interleukin-15 (IL-15)-deficient mice reportedly have impaired TRM formation, and IL-15 promotes TRM function ex vivo. We found that both human and mouse TRM express the CD122 subunit of the IL-15 receptor and that keratinocytes up-regulate CD215, the subunit required to display the cytokine on their surface to promote activation of T cells. Targeting IL-15 signaling with an anti-CD122 antibody reverses disease in mice with established vitiligo. Short-term treatment with anti-CD122 inhibits TRM production of interferon-γ (IFNγ), and long-term treatment depletes TRM from skin lesions. Short-term treatment with anti-CD122 can provide durable repigmentation when administered either systemically or locally in the skin. On the basis of these data, we propose that targeting CD122 may be a highly effective and even durable treatment strategy for vitiligo and other tissue-specific autoimmune diseases involving TRM.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 56 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 10 24%
Unspecified 6 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 15%
Student > Bachelor 5 12%
Student > Master 4 10%
Other 10 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 9 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 22%
Unspecified 7 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 12%
Other 5 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 172. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 May 2019.
All research outputs
#75,278
of 12,986,724 outputs
Outputs from Science Translational Medicine
#309
of 3,637 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#3,578
of 266,855 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Science Translational Medicine
#19
of 105 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,986,724 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,637 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 60.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,855 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 105 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.