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Identification of serum proteome signatures of locally advanced and metastatic gastric cancer: a pilot study

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, September 2015
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Title
Identification of serum proteome signatures of locally advanced and metastatic gastric cancer: a pilot study
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12967-015-0668-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Agata Abramowicz, Anna Wojakowska, Agnieszka Gdowicz-Klosok, Joanna Polanska, Pawel Rodziewicz, Pawel Polanowski, Agnieszka Namysl-Kaletka, Monika Pietrowska, Jerzy Wydmanski, Piotr Widlak

Abstract

The gastric cancer is one of the most common and mortal cancer worldwide. The initial asymptomatic development and further nonspecific symptoms result in diagnosis at the advanced stage with poor prognosis. Yet, no clinically useful biomarkers are available for this malignancy, and invasive gastrointestinal endoscopy remains the only reliable option at the moment. Hence, there is a need for discovery of clinically useful noninvasive diagnostic and/or prognostic tool as an alternative (or complement) for current diagnostic tools. Here we aimed to search for serum proteins characteristic for local and invasive gastric cancer. Pre-treatment blood samples were collected from patients with diagnosed gastric adenocarcinoma at the different stage of disease: 35 patients with locally advanced cancer and 18 patients with metastatic cancer; 50 healthy donors were also included as a control group. The low-molecular-weight fraction of serum proteome (i.e., endogenous peptidome) was profiled by the MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry, and the whole proteome components were identified and quantified by the LC-MS/MS shotgun approach. Multicomponent peptidome signatures were revealed that allowed good discrimination between healthy controls and cancer patients, as well as between patients with locally advanced and metastatic cancer. Moreover, a LC-MS/MS approach revealed 49 serum proteins with different abundances between healthy donors and cancer patients (predominantly proteins associated with inflammation and acute phase response). Furthermore, 19 serum proteins with different abundances between patients with locally advanced and metastatic cancer were identified (including proteins associated with cytokine/chemokine response and metabolism of nucleic acids). However, neither peptidome profiling nor shotgun proteomics approach allowed detecting serum components discriminating between two subgroups of patients with local disease who either developed or did not develop metastases during follow-up. The molecular differences between locally advanced and metastatic gastric cancer, as well as more obvious differences between healthy individuals and cancer patients, have marked reflection at the level of serum proteome. However, we have no evidence that features of pre-treatment serum proteome could predict a risk of cancer dissemination in patients treated due to local disease. Nevertheless, presented data confirmed potential applicability of a serum proteome signature-based biomarker in diagnostics of gastric cancer.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor > Associate Professor 5 18%
Researcher 5 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 14%
Student > Master 4 14%
Other 2 7%
Other 5 18%
Unknown 3 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 29%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 18%
Computer Science 3 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Other 4 14%
Unknown 4 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 September 2015.
All research outputs
#2,803,264
of 6,364,199 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#726
of 1,568 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#97,254
of 198,223 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#50
of 88 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,364,199 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 53rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,568 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 198,223 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 88 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.