↓ Skip to main content

How to squat? Effects of various stance widths, foot placement angles and level of experience on knee, hip and trunk motion and loading

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, July 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 233)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
twitter
129 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
182 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
How to squat? Effects of various stance widths, foot placement angles and level of experience on knee, hip and trunk motion and loading
Published in
BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s13102-018-0103-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Silvio Lorenzetti, Mira Ostermann, Fabian Zeidler, Pia Zimmer, Lina Jentsch, Renate List, William R. Taylor, Florian Schellenberg

Abstract

Squatting is a core exercise for many purposes. The tissue loading during squatting is crucial for positive adaptation and to avoid injury. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of narrow, hip and wide stance widths, foot position angles (0°, 21°, and 42°), strength exercise experience, and barbell load (0 and 50% body weight, experts only) during squatting. Novice (N = 21) and experienced (N = 21) squatters performed 9 different variations of squats (3 stance widths, 3 foot placement angles). A 3D motion capture system (100 Hz) and two force plates (2000 Hz) were used to record mediolateral knee displacement (ΔD*), range of motion (RoM) at the hip and knee joints, and joint moments at the hip, knee, and lower back. Both stance width and foot placement angles affected the moments at the hip and knee joints in the frontal and sagittal planes. ΔD* varied with stance width, foot placement angles and between the subjects' level of experience with the squat exercise as follows: increasing foot angle led to an increased foot angle led to an increased ΔD*, while an increased stance width resulted in a decreased ΔD*; novice squatters showed a higher ΔD*, while additional weight triggered a decreased ΔD*. Suitable stance width and foot placement angles should be chosen according to the targeted joint moments. In order to avoid injury, special care should be taken in extreme positions (narrow stand-42° and wide stance-0°) where large knee and hips joint moments were observed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 129 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 182 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 182 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 48 26%
Student > Bachelor 44 24%
Other 11 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 4%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 4%
Other 26 14%
Unknown 38 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 63 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 27 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 9%
Engineering 8 4%
Materials Science 2 1%
Other 15 8%
Unknown 50 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 123. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 September 2020.
All research outputs
#168,646
of 15,922,891 outputs
Outputs from BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
#4
of 233 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#5,822
of 278,137 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Sports Science, Medicine and Rehabilitation
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,922,891 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 233 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,137 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them