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Does turning trauma patients with an unstable spinal injury from the supine to a lateral position increase the risk of neurological deterioration? – A systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
11 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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48 Mendeley
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Title
Does turning trauma patients with an unstable spinal injury from the supine to a lateral position increase the risk of neurological deterioration? – A systematic review
Published in
Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13049-015-0143-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Per Kristian Hyldmo, Gunn E. Vist, Anders Christian Feyling, Leif Rognås, Vidar Magnusson, Mårten Sandberg, Eldar Søreide

Abstract

Airway protection and spinal precautions are competing concerns in the treatment of unconscious trauma patients. The placement of such patients in a lateral position may facilitate the acquisition of an adequate airway. However, trauma dogma dictates that patients should be transported in the supine position to minimize spinal movement. In this systematic review, we sought to answer the following question: Given an existing spinal injury, will changing a patient's position from supine to lateral increase the risk of neurological deterioration? The review protocol was published in the PROSPERO database (Reg. no. CRD42012001190). We performed literature searches in PubMed, Medline, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, CINAHL and the British Nursing Index and included studies of traumatic spinal injury, lateral positioning and neurological deterioration. The search was updated prior to submission. Two researchers independently completed each step in the review process. We identified 1,164 publications. However, none of these publications reported mortality or neurological deterioration with lateral positioning as an outcome measure. Twelve studies used movement of the injured spine with lateral positioning as an outcome measure; eleven of these investigations were cadaver studies. All of these cadaver studies reported spinal movement during lateral positioning. The only identified human study included eighteen patients with thoracic or lumbar spinal fractures; according to the study authors, the logrolling technique did not result in any neurological deterioration among these patients. We identified no clinical studies demonstrating that rotating trauma patients from the supine position to a lateral position affects mortality or causes neurological deterioration. However, in various cadaver models, this type of rotation did produce statistically significant displacements of the injured spine. The clinical significance of these cadaver-based observations remains unclear. The present evidence for harm in rotating trauma patients from the supine position to a lateral position, including the logroll maneuver, is inconclusive.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 48 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Mexico 1 2%
Unknown 46 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 7 15%
Student > Bachelor 6 13%
Student > Master 5 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 10%
Student > Postgraduate 4 8%
Other 17 35%
Unknown 4 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 56%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 19%
Sports and Recreations 2 4%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 2%
Other 5 10%
Unknown 3 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 December 2016.
All research outputs
#1,264,504
of 15,641,217 outputs
Outputs from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#105
of 960 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,914
of 248,266 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scandinavian Journal of Trauma, Resuscitation and Emergency Medicine
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,641,217 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 960 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,266 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them