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Faecal microbiota characterisation of horses using 16 rdna barcoded pyrosequencing, and carriage rate of clostridium difficile at hospital admission

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, September 2015
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2 tweeters

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35 Dimensions

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68 Mendeley
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Title
Faecal microbiota characterisation of horses using 16 rdna barcoded pyrosequencing, and carriage rate of clostridium difficile at hospital admission
Published in
BMC Microbiology, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12866-015-0514-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Cristina Rodriguez, Bernard Taminiau, Bastien Brévers, Véronique Avesani, Johan Van Broeck, Aurélia Leroux, Marjorie Gallot, Antoine Bruwier, Hélene Amory, Michel Delmée, Georges Daube

Abstract

The equine faecal microbiota is very complex and remains largely unknown, while interspecies interactions have an important contribution to animal health. Clostridium difficile has been identified as an important cause of diarrhoea in horses. This study provides further information on the nature of the bacterial communities present in horses developing an episode of diarrhoea. The prevalence of C. difficile in hospitalised horses at the time of admission is also reported. Bacterial diversity of the gut microbiota in diarrhoea is lower than that in non-diarrhoeic horses in terms of species richness (p-value <0.002) and in population evenness (p-value: 0.02). Statistical differences for Actinobacillus, Porphyromonas, RC9 group, Roseburia and Ruminococcaceae were revealed. Fusobacteria was found in horses with diarrhoea but not in any of the horses with non-diarrheic faeces. In contrast, Akkermansia was among the three predominant taxa in all of the horses studied. The overall prevalence of C. difficile in the total samples of hospitalised horses at admission was 3.7 % (5/134), with five different PCR-ribotypes identified, including PCR-ribotype 014. Two colonised horses displayed a decreased bacterial species richness compared to the remaining subjects studied, which shared the same Bacteroides genus. However, none of the positive animals had diarrhoea at the moment of sampling. The abundance of some taxa in the faecal microbiota of diarrhoeic horses can be a result of microbiome dysbiosis, and therefore a cause of intestinal disease, or some of these taxa may act as equine enteric pathogens. Clostridium difficile colonisation seems to be transient in all of the horses studied, without overgrowth to trigger infection. A large proportion of the sequences were unclassified, showing the complexity of horses' faecal microbiota.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Cambodia 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 66 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 13 19%
Student > Master 13 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 13%
Student > Bachelor 8 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 12%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 9 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 19 28%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 16 24%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 7%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 7%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 10 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 January 2016.
All research outputs
#4,915,446
of 6,922,153 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#771
of 1,231 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#141,494
of 229,295 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#38
of 68 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,922,153 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,231 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 229,295 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 68 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.