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The relationship of recombination rate, genome structure, and patterns of molecular evolution across angiosperms

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, September 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (65th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site

Citations

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37 Dimensions

Readers on

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83 Mendeley
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Title
The relationship of recombination rate, genome structure, and patterns of molecular evolution across angiosperms
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0473-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

George P. Tiley, J. Gordon Burleigh

Abstract

Although homologous recombination affects the efficacy of selection in populations, the pattern of recombination rate evolution and its effects on genome evolution across plants are largely unknown. Recombination can reduce genome size by enabling the removal of LTR retrotransposons, alter codon usage by GC biased gene conversion, contribute to complex histories of gene duplication and loss through tandem duplication, and enhance purifying selection on genes. Therefore, variation in recombination rate across species may explain some of the variation in genomic architecture as well as rates of molecular evolution. We used phylogenetic comparative methods to investigate the evolution of global meiotic recombination rate in angiosperms and its effects on genome architecture and selection at the molecular level using genetic maps and genome sequences from thirty angiosperm species. Recombination rate is negatively correlated with genome size, which is likely caused by the removal of LTR retrotransposons. After correcting recombination rates for euchromatin content, we also found an association between global recombination rate and average gene family size. This suggests a role for recombination in the preservation of duplicate genes or expansion of gene families. An analysis of the correlation between the ratio of nonsynonymous to synonymous substitution rates (dN/dS) and recombination rate in 3748 genes indicates that higher recombination rates are associated with an increased efficacy of purifying selection, suggesting that global recombination rates affect variation in rates of molecular evolution across distantly related angiosperm species, not just between populations. We also identified shifts in dN/dS for recombination proteins that are associated with shifts in global recombination rate across our sample of angiosperms. Although our analyses only reveal correlations, not mechanisms, and do not include potential covariates of recombination rate, like effective population size, they suggest that global recombination rates may play an important role in shaping the macroevolutionary patterns of gene and genome evolution in plants. Interspecific recombination rate variation is tightly correlated with genome size as well as variation in overall LTR retrotransposon abundances. Recombination may shape gene-to-gene variation in dN/dS between species, which might impact the overall gene duplication and loss rates.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Norway 1 1%
Netherlands 1 1%
France 1 1%
Germany 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Czechia 1 1%
Portugal 1 1%
Poland 1 1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 73 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 39%
Researcher 21 25%
Student > Bachelor 4 5%
Professor > Associate Professor 4 5%
Other 3 4%
Other 9 11%
Unknown 10 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 53 64%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 13 16%
Computer Science 3 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 1%
Unknown 13 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 April 2017.
All research outputs
#5,053,640
of 10,618,812 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,289
of 2,185 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#80,654
of 240,746 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#37
of 81 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,618,812 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 52nd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,185 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.8. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,746 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 81 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.