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Inpatient care of small and sick newborns: a multi-country analysis of health system bottlenecks and potential solutions

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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63 Dimensions

Readers on

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251 Mendeley
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Title
Inpatient care of small and sick newborns: a multi-country analysis of health system bottlenecks and potential solutions
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/1471-2393-15-s2-s7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah G Moxon, Joy E Lawn, Kim E Dickson, Aline Simen-Kapeu, Gagan Gupta, Ashok Deorari, Nalini Singhal, Karen New, Carole Kenner, Vinod Bhutani, Rakesh Kumar, Elizabeth Molyneux, Hannah Blencowe

Abstract

Preterm birth is the leading cause of child death worldwide. Small and sick newborns require timely, high-quality inpatient care to survive. This includes provision of warmth, feeding support, safe oxygen therapy and effective phototherapy with prevention and treatment of infections. Inpatient care for newborns requires dedicated ward space, staffed by health workers with specialist training and skills. Many of the estimated 2.8 million newborns that die every year do not have access to such specialised care. The bottleneck analysis tool was applied in 12 countries in Africa and Asia as part of the Every Newborn Action Plan process. Country workshops involved technical experts to complete the survey tool, which is designed to synthesise and grade health system "bottlenecks" (or factors that hinder the scale up) of maternal-newborn intervention packages. For this paper, we used quantitative and qualitative methods to analyse the bottleneck data, and combined these with literature review, to present priority bottlenecks and actions relevant to different health system building blocks for inpatient care of small and sick newborns. Inpatient care of small and sick newborns is an intervention package highlighted by all country workshop participants as having critical health system challenges. Health system building blocks with the highest graded (significant or major) bottlenecks were health workforce (10 out of 12 countries) and health financing (10 out of 12 countries), followed by community ownership and partnership (9 out of 12 countries). Priority actions based on solution themes for these bottlenecks are discussed. Whilst major bottlenecks to the scale-up of quality inpatient newborn care are present, effective solutions exist. For all countries included, there is a critical need for a neonatal nursing cadre. Small and sick newborns require increased, sustained funding with specific insurance schemes to cover inpatient care and avoid catastrophic out-of-pocket payments. Core competencies, by level of care, should be defined for monitoring of newborn inpatient care, as with emergency obstetric care. Rather than fatalism that small and sick newborns will die, community interventions need to create demand for accessible, high-quality, family-centred inpatient care, including kangaroo mother care, so that every newborn can survive and thrive.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 251 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 <1%
Ethiopia 1 <1%
Indonesia 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Niger 1 <1%
Unknown 246 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 56 22%
Researcher 37 15%
Student > Postgraduate 26 10%
Student > Bachelor 26 10%
Other 16 6%
Other 56 22%
Unknown 34 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 101 40%
Nursing and Health Professions 47 19%
Social Sciences 25 10%
Psychology 7 3%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 4 2%
Other 22 9%
Unknown 45 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 September 2015.
All research outputs
#2,259,053
of 6,375,336 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#732
of 1,374 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,713
of 198,957 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#40
of 98 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,375,336 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 63rd percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,374 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 198,957 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 98 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.