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Larval and adult environmental temperatures influence the adult reproductive traits of Anopheles gambiae s.s.

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, September 2015
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Title
Larval and adult environmental temperatures influence the adult reproductive traits of Anopheles gambiae s.s.
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13071-015-1053-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Céline D. Christiansen-Jucht, Paul E. Parham, Adam Saddler, Jacob C. Koella, María-Gloria Basáñez

Abstract

Anopheles mosquito life-history parameters and population dynamics strongly influence malaria transmission, and environmental factors, particularly temperature, strongly affect these parameters. There are currently some studies on how temperature affects Anopheles gambiae s.s. survival but very few exist examining other life-history traits. We investigate here the effect of temperature on population dynamics parameters. Anopheles gambiae s.s. immatures were reared individually at 23 ± 1 °C, 27 ± 1 °C, 31 ± 1 °C, and 35 ± 1 °C, and adults were held at their larval temperature or at one of the other temperatures. Larvae were checked every 24 h for development to the next stage and measured for size; wing length was measured as a proxy for adult size. Females were blood fed three times, and the number of females feeding and laying eggs was counted. The numbers of eggs and percentage of eggs hatched were recorded. Increasing temperatures during the larval stages resulted in significantly smaller larvae (p = 0.005) and smaller adults (p < 0.001). Adult temperature had no effect on the time to egg laying, and the larval temperature of adults only affected the incubation period of the first egg batch. Temperature influenced the time to hatching of eggs, as well as the time to development at every stage. The number of eggs laid was highest when adults were kept at 27 °C, and lowest at 31 °C, and higher adult temperatures decreased the proportion of eggs hatching after the second and third blood meal. Higher adult temperatures significantly decreased the probability of blood feeding, but the larval temperature of adults had no influence on the probability of taking a blood meal. Differences were observed between the first, second, and third blood meal in the times to egg laying and hatching, number of eggs laid, and probabilities of feeding and laying eggs. Our study shows that environmental temperature during the larval stages as well as during the adult stages affects Anopheles life-history parameters. Data on how temperature and other climatic factors affect vector life-history parameters are necessary to parameterise more reliably models predicting how global warming may influence malaria transmission.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 83 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 83 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 28%
Student > Master 16 19%
Researcher 12 14%
Student > Bachelor 6 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 5%
Other 5 6%
Unknown 17 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 34%
Environmental Science 11 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 4%
Other 8 10%
Unknown 21 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 19 September 2015.
All research outputs
#5,574,292
of 7,371,183 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,424
of 1,985 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#159,115
of 231,368 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#102
of 145 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,371,183 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,985 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 145 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.