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Responses of the Human Brain to Mild Dehydration and Rehydration Explored In Vivo by1H-MR Imaging and Spectroscopy

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Neuroradiology, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#10 of 4,800)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
20 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
10 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
35 Mendeley
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Title
Responses of the Human Brain to Mild Dehydration and Rehydration Explored In Vivo by1H-MR Imaging and Spectroscopy
Published in
American Journal of Neuroradiology, September 2015
DOI 10.3174/ajnr.a4508
Pubmed ID
Authors

A. Biller, M. Reuter, B. Patenaude, G.A. Homola, F. Breuer, M. Bendszus, A.J. Bartsch

Abstract

As yet, there are no in vivo data on tissue water changes and associated morphometric changes involved in the osmo-adaptation of normal brains. Our aim was to evaluate osmoadaptive responses of the healthy human brain to osmotic challenges of de- and rehydration by serial measurements of brain volume, tissue fluid, and metabolites. Serial T1-weighted and (1)H-MR spectroscopy data were acquired in 15 healthy individuals at normohydration, on 12 hours of dehydration, and during 1 hour of oral rehydration. Osmotic challenges were monitored by serum measures, including osmolality and hematocrit. MR imaging data were analyzed by using FreeSurfer and LCModel. On dehydration, serum osmolality increased by 0.67% and brain tissue fluid decreased by 1.63%, on average. MR imaging morphometry demonstrated corresponding decreases of cortical thickness and volumes of the whole brain, cortex, white matter, and hypothalamus/thalamus. These changes reversed during rehydration. Continuous fluid ingestion of 1 L of water for 1 hour within the scanner lowered serum osmolality by 0.96% and increased brain tissue fluid by 0.43%, on average. Concomitantly, cortical thickness and volumes of the whole brain, cortex, white matter, and hypothalamus/thalamus increased. Changes in brain tissue fluid were related to volume changes of the whole brain, the white matter, and hypothalamus/thalamus. Only volume changes of the hypothalamus/thalamus significantly correlated with serum osmolality. This is the first study simultaneously evaluating changes in brain tissue fluid, metabolites, volume, and cortical thickness. Our results reflect cellular volume regulatory mechanisms at a macroscopic level and emphasize that it is essential to control for hydration levels in studies on brain morphometry and metabolism in order to avoid confounding the findings.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 35 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 26%
Researcher 5 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 11%
Student > Master 4 11%
Student > Bachelor 3 9%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 5 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 9 26%
Neuroscience 6 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 6%
Engineering 2 6%
Other 7 20%
Unknown 6 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 161. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 September 2022.
All research outputs
#199,805
of 22,141,209 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Neuroradiology
#10
of 4,800 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,839
of 264,860 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Neuroradiology
#1
of 97 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,141,209 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,800 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 264,860 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 97 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.