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A PCR-RFLP Assay targeting RPS8 gene for the discrimination between bovine Babesia and Theileria species in China

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, September 2015
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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21 Mendeley
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Title
A PCR-RFLP Assay targeting RPS8 gene for the discrimination between bovine Babesia and Theileria species in China
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13071-015-1085-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Zhancheng Tian, Junzheng Du, Jifei Yang, Aihong Liu, Xiaocui Liu, Guangyuan Liu, Hong Yin

Abstract

Bovine babesiosis and theileriosis is an important hemoprotozoal disease in cattles and yaks in tropical and subtropical regions leading to significant economic losses. In the field, the risk of co-infection between the bovine Babesia and Theileria species is very high. Thus, it is necessary to develop a simple, accurate, rapid and cost-effective method for large-scale epidemic investigation, in particular for the detection of co-infection in field. In this study, DNA sequences of a ribosomal protein S8 (RPS8) gene from eight species of cattle piroplasms in China were used to develop a species-specific PCR-RFLP diagnostic tool. The eight Theileria and Babesia species could be differentiated by digesting the RPS8 PCR product with Mbo I. The sensitivity of the PCR assays was 0.1 pg DNA for Babesia species but 1 pg DNA for Theileria species. The clearly different size of the PCR-RFLP products allowed for a direct discrimination between eight bovine Theileria and Babesia species (T. annulata, T. sinensis, T. sergenti, B. ovata, B. bovis, B. bigemina, B. major and Babesia species Kashi isolate). Our results indicated that the established method based on the RPS8 gene was a reliable molecular diagnostic tool for the simultaneous detection and identification of bovine Babesia and Theileria species in China, which could be applicable for the survey of parasite dynamics, epidemiological studies as well as prevention and control of the disease.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 21 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 21 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 24%
Student > Bachelor 3 14%
Researcher 2 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 10%
Other 4 19%
Unknown 3 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 33%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 4 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 October 2015.
All research outputs
#9,625,562
of 15,703,527 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#2,226
of 4,215 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#126,123
of 249,877 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,703,527 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,215 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 249,877 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them