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The effect of diet on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in dogs

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Research Notes, September 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)

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8 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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12 Dimensions

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33 Mendeley
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Title
The effect of diet on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations in dogs
Published in
BMC Research Notes, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13104-015-1360-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Claire R. Sharp, Kim A. Selting, Randy Ringold

Abstract

Vitamin D (vitD) deficiency is linked to many disease states including rickets and cancer, and vitD supplementation to improve response to cancer therapy has been explored. Supplementation may be most appropriate for dogs with suboptimal vitD concentrations. In dogs, the primary source of vitD is diet (predominantly via commercial dog food). Our goal was to determine how food source and supplements affect 25(OH)D concentrations, the storage form of vitD. Serum was collected from clinically healthy dogs, and pet owners were surveyed about food source and supplements. Serum 25(OH)D concentration was measured using a quantitative chemiluminescent assay (LIASON, DiaSorin, Stillwater, MN). Dogs (n = 320) were tested for serum 25(OH)D concentrations (range 9.5-249.2 ng/mL). Dogs were fed commercial diets from forty different manufactures (n = 292); additionally some dogs were fed homemade diets (n = 18) or a combination of commercial and homemade diets (n = 10). Median serum 25(OH)D concentrations in dogs fed commercial foods ranged from 47.4 to 100.1 ng/mL with an overall median of 67.9 ng/ml (CV 29 %). Analysis for differences among manufacturers was significant (P = 0.0006). Serum 25(OH)D concentrations amongst dogs fed homemade diets had the largest range (9.5-129 ng/mL) and the lowest value (9.5 ng/mL). Dogs receiving salmon oil as a supplement (n = 22) had significantly higher serum 25(OH)D (on average a 19.6 ng/mL increase) than those not receiving a supplement (P = 0.007). Serum 25(OH)D concentrations in dogs vary widely which likely reflects varying dietary vitD content. Notable differences exist among manufacturers and brands and may reflect differences in proprietary formulations. Given the variability of measured serum 25(OH)D concentrations in dogs and the importance vitD appears to have on health status, dietary vitD content should be optimized.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 8 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 33 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 33 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 21%
Other 7 21%
Researcher 4 12%
Student > Bachelor 4 12%
Student > Postgraduate 3 9%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 4 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 13 39%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 15%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 3%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 5 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 6. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 October 2016.
All research outputs
#3,090,175
of 13,622,360 outputs
Outputs from BMC Research Notes
#487
of 3,101 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#54,873
of 246,233 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Research Notes
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,622,360 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,101 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 246,233 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them