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NSAID Use and Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: The Liver Cancer Pooling Project

Overview of attention for article published in Cancer Prevention Research, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (55th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (65th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
28 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
22 Mendeley
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Title
NSAID Use and Risk of Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma: The Liver Cancer Pooling Project
Published in
Cancer Prevention Research, September 2015
DOI 10.1158/1940-6207.capr-15-0126
Pubmed ID
Authors

J. L. Petrick, V. V. Sahasrabuddhe, A. T. Chan, M. C. Alavanja, L. E. Beane-Freeman, J. E. Buring, J. Chen, D. Q. Chong, N. D. Freedman, C. S. Fuchs, J. M. Gaziano, E. Giovannucci, B. I. Graubard, A. R. Hollenbeck, L. Hou, E. J. Jacobs, L. Y. King, J. Koshiol, I.-M. Lee, M. S. Linet, J. R. Palmer, M. P. Purdue, L. Rosenberg, C. Schairer, H. D. Sesso, A. J. Sigurdson, J. Wactawski-Wende, A. Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, P. T. Campbell, K. A. McGlynn

Abstract

Chronic inflammation plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC), the two most common types of liver cancer. A number of prior experimental studies have suggested that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin and ibuprofen, may potentially protect against liver cancer. However, no observational study has examined the association between aspirin duration and dose or other over-the-counter non-aspirin NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen, and liver cancer incidence. Furthermore, the association between NSAID use and risk of ICC is unclear. As part of the Liver Cancer Pooling Project, we harmonized data on 1,084,133 individuals (HCC=679, ICC=225) from ten US-based prospective cohort studies. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to evaluate multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Current aspirin use, versus nonuse, was inversely associated with HCC (HR=0.68, 95% CI=0.57-0.81), which persisted when restricted to individuals not using non-aspirin NSAIDs and in a 5 and 10-year lag analysis. The association between aspirin use and HCC risk was stronger for users who reported daily use, longer duration use, and lower dosage. Ibuprofen use was not associated with HCC risk. Aspirin use was associated with a reduced ICC risk in men (HR=0.64, 95% CI=0.42-0.98) but not women (HR=1.34, 95% CI=0.89-2.01, pinteraction=0.01). The observed inverse association between aspirin use and liver cancer in our study, together with previous data, suggest the merit of future intervention studies of aspirin and other agents that affect chronic inflammatory pathways for HCC and possibly ICC.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 9%
Unknown 20 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 27%
Student > Bachelor 4 18%
Student > Master 3 14%
Student > Postgraduate 2 9%
Unspecified 2 9%
Other 5 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 36%
Unspecified 5 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 14%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 5%
Other 2 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 September 2015.
All research outputs
#7,479,108
of 13,046,126 outputs
Outputs from Cancer Prevention Research
#569
of 909 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#108,856
of 247,187 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Cancer Prevention Research
#12
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,046,126 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 909 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.4. This one is in the 36th percentile – i.e., 36% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 247,187 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 55% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its contemporaries.