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Use of a rapid test to assess plasma Plasmodium falciparum HRP2 and guide management of severe febrile illness

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

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25 Mendeley
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Title
Use of a rapid test to assess plasma Plasmodium falciparum HRP2 and guide management of severe febrile illness
Published in
Malaria Journal, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12936-015-0900-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ipsita Sinha, Nattwut Ekapirat, Arjen M. Dondorp, Charles J. Woodrow

Abstract

Plasma Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein-2 (PfHRP2) is the most accurate biomarker for severe malaria, but its measurement by ELISA has been considered too unwieldy to incorporate into clinical management. Plasma samples covering a wide range of PfHRP2 concentrations were applied to rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). RDTs were read by eye and digital capture, and PfHRP2 concentrations were measured via serial dilution with results compared to ELISA readings. The Paracheck (®) brand showed the strongest correlation (r(2) = 0.963) as well as the lowest inter-observer variability (combined kappa across band intensities for three observers = 0.938). Plasma PfHRP2 measurement via serial dilution showed minimal bias compared to ELISA and acceptable limits of agreement. Three different dilutions of a well characterized set of admission samples from uncomplicated and severe malaria patients studied in a low transmission setting gave an area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of 0.844 in terms of identifying severe malaria. These studies show that plasma PfHRP2 can be assessed via a single RDT, with application of a plasma dilution of 1:5 or 1:10 providing useful diagnostic information to assist in patient management or clinical trial inclusion.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 25 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 25 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 20%
Researcher 3 12%
Student > Bachelor 3 12%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 2 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 8 32%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 4%
Other 3 12%
Unknown 4 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 October 2015.
All research outputs
#1,404,543
of 6,349,067 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#648
of 2,274 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,356
of 200,893 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#38
of 132 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,349,067 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,274 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 200,893 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 132 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.