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A Highly Selective Electrochemical DNA-Based Sensor That Employs Steric Hindrance Effects to Detect Proteins Directly in Whole Blood

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the American Chemical Society, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#45 of 55,413)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
19 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
21 tweeters
patent
3 patents
facebook
1 Facebook page
reddit
4 Redditors

Citations

dimensions_citation
113 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
130 Mendeley
Title
A Highly Selective Electrochemical DNA-Based Sensor That Employs Steric Hindrance Effects to Detect Proteins Directly in Whole Blood
Published in
Journal of the American Chemical Society, September 2015
DOI 10.1021/jacs.5b04942
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sahar Sadat Mahshid, Sébastien Camiré, Francesco Ricci, Alexis Vallée-Bélisle

Abstract

The development of rapid, low cost, easy-to-use approaches for the quantitative detection of multiple biomarkers would drastically impact global health by enabling medical diagnosis at the point-of-care. Unfortunately, current multiplexed methods for the quantitative detection of antibodies or other disease markers (e.g., enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), Western blots, fluorescence polarization assays) remain complex multiple-step assays that rely on well-trained technicians and expensive instrumentations. As a promising alternative, we describe here a novel signal transduction mechanism for the one-step detection of any large macromolecules (e.g. antibodies) that utilizes steric hindrance effects at the nanoscale. More specifically, this homogenous assay takes advantage of the large dimension of macromolecules in comparison to the diameter of a double stranded DNA helix: upon binding to a signaling DNA strand that contain a small recognition element, the relatively large macromolecule will reduce the number of signaling strands that can hybridize on its complementary sequence immobilized on a surface. Here we demonstrate this steric hindrance hybridization assay using an electrochemical readout (eSHHA) and show that it enables the quantitative, one-step detection of four different macromolecules in the low nanomolar range in less than 10 minutes directly in whole blood. This inexpensive eSHHA sensor can be readily multiplexed and used for the point-of-care detection of any proteins for which we possess a small recognition element that we can attach to DNA.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 130 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Unknown 127 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 35 27%
Researcher 20 15%
Student > Master 19 15%
Student > Bachelor 9 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 6%
Other 22 17%
Unknown 17 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Chemistry 47 36%
Engineering 21 16%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 12 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 8%
Chemical Engineering 4 3%
Other 10 8%
Unknown 25 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 169. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 July 2019.
All research outputs
#140,218
of 18,242,827 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the American Chemical Society
#45
of 55,413 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,453
of 257,168 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the American Chemical Society
#4
of 490 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,242,827 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 55,413 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,168 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 490 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.