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Liquid crystalline bacterial outer membranes are critical for antibiotic susceptibility

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Citations

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mendeley
38 Mendeley
Title
Liquid crystalline bacterial outer membranes are critical for antibiotic susceptibility
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, July 2018
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1803975115
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicolò Paracini, Luke A. Clifton, Maximilian W. A. Skoda, Jeremy H. Lakey

Abstract

The outer membrane (OM) of Gram-negative bacteria is a robust, impermeable, asymmetric bilayer of outer lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) and inner phospholipids containing selective pore proteins which confer on it the properties of a molecular sieve. This structure severely limits the variety of antibiotic molecules effective against Gram-negative pathogens and, as antibiotic resistance has increased, so has the need to solve the OM permeability problem. Polymyxin B (PmB) represents those rare antibiotics which act directly on the OM and which offer a distinct starting point for new antibiotic development. Here we investigate PmB's interactions with in vitro OM models and show how the physical state of the lipid matrix of the OM is a critical factor in regulating the interaction with the antimicrobial peptide. Using neutron reflectometry and infrared spectroscopy, we reveal the structural and chemical changes induced by PmB on OM models of increasing complexity. In particular, only a tightly packed model reproduced the temperature-controlled disruption of the asymmetric lipid bilayer by PmB observed in vivo. By measuring the order of outer-leaflet LPS and inner-leaflet phospholipids, we show that PmB insertion is dependent on the phase transition of LPS from the gel to the liquid crystalline state. The demonstration of a lipid phase transition in the physiological temperature range also supports the hypothesis that bacteria grown at different temperatures adapt their LPS structures to maintain a homeoviscous OM.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 35 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 38 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 42%
Researcher 6 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 11%
Professor 3 8%
Unspecified 3 8%
Other 6 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 14 37%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 21%
Unspecified 6 16%
Chemistry 4 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 5%
Other 4 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 40. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 December 2018.
All research outputs
#383,193
of 12,733,544 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#8,077
of 78,537 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,998
of 275,296 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#269
of 928 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,733,544 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 78,537 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 22.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,296 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 928 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.