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Social Capital and Dietary Intakes Following the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Epidemiology, March 2019
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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28 Mendeley
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Title
Social Capital and Dietary Intakes Following the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami
Published in
Journal of Epidemiology, March 2019
DOI 10.2188/jea.je20170117
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sayuri Goryoda, Nobuo Nishi, Haruki Shimoda, Yuki Yonekura, Kiyomi Sakata, Seiichiro Kobayashi, Akira Ogawa, Ichiro Kawachi

Abstract

Previous studies have identified poor dietary intake as a health risk affecting survivors of the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami. We examined the association between different social factors (eg, living conditions and perceptions of community social capital) and dietary intakes among disaster-affected survivors. We studied 6,724 survivors in four municipalities of Iwate Prefecture 3 years after the disaster. Social capital was assessed via four items inquiring about respondents' perceptions of social cohesion in their communities. Good dietary intake was defined according to the following criteria: intake of staple food ≥three times a day; intake of meat, fish and shellfish eggs, or soybean products ≥twice a day; vegetable intake ≥twice a day; and intake of fruit or dairy products ≥once a day. An individual who did not meet any of these criteria was defined as having poor dietary intake. We adjusted for covariates, including socioeconomic status, marital status, and residential area. Poor dietary intake was reported by 31.6% of respondents. Poisson regression analyses revealed that the following factors were related to poor dietary intake: age <65 years (men: prevalence ratio [PR] 1.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.29-1.71 and women: PR 1.55; 95% CI, 1.36-1.77), difficulties in living conditions (men: PR 1.18; 95% CI, 1.00-1.39 and women: PR 1.19; 95% CI, 1.01-1.40), and low perceptions of community social capital (women: PR 1.20; 95% CI, 1.04-1.38). Our findings suggest that social capital plays a role in promoting healthy dietary intake among women in disaster-affected areas.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 18%
Student > Master 5 18%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 14%
Researcher 2 7%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Other 4 14%
Unknown 6 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 7 25%
Social Sciences 3 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 2 7%
Arts and Humanities 1 4%
Other 5 18%
Unknown 8 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 March 2019.
All research outputs
#8,365,152
of 14,510,072 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Epidemiology
#284
of 504 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#143,080
of 275,444 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Epidemiology
#4
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,510,072 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 504 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.4. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,444 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.