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Plant–animal worms round themselves up in circular mills on the beach

Overview of attention for article published in Royal Society Open Science, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
twitter
409 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
2 Mendeley
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Title
Plant–animal worms round themselves up in circular mills on the beach
Published in
Royal Society Open Science, July 2018
DOI 10.1098/rsos.180665
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ana B. Sendova-Franks, Nigel R. Franks, Alan Worley

Abstract

Collective motion is a fascinating and intensely studied manifestation of collective behaviour. Circular milling is an impressive example. It occurs in fishes, processionary caterpillars and army ants, among others. Its adaptive significance, however, is not yet well understood. Recently, we demonstrated experimentally circular milling in the marine plant-animal worm Symsagittifera roscoffensis. We hypothesized that its function is to gather the worms and facilitate the dense films they form on the beach to promote the photosynthesis of their symbiotic algae. Here, we report for the first time, to our knowledge, the occurrence of S. roscoffensis circular mills in nature and show that it is by no means rare. The size and behaviour of circular mills in their natural environment is compatible with our earlier experimental results. This makes S. roscoffensis a good study system for understanding the proximate and ultimate mechanisms of circular milling.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 409 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 2 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 2 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor > Associate Professor 1 50%
Researcher 1 50%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 100%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 178. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 August 2018.
All research outputs
#60,913
of 11,810,431 outputs
Outputs from Royal Society Open Science
#101
of 1,574 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,999
of 240,134 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Royal Society Open Science
#2
of 109 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,810,431 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,574 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 50.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 240,134 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 109 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.