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Many Atolls May be Uninhabitable Within Decades Due to Climate Change

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
policy
2 policy sources
twitter
40 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
69 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
124 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Many Atolls May be Uninhabitable Within Decades Due to Climate Change
Published in
Scientific Reports, September 2015
DOI 10.1038/srep14546
Pubmed ID
Authors

Curt D. Storlazzi, Edwin P.L. Elias, Paul Berkowitz

Abstract

Observations show global sea level is rising due to climate change, with the highest rates in the tropical Pacific Ocean where many of the world's low-lying atolls are located. Sea-level rise is particularly critical for low-lying carbonate reef-lined atoll islands; these islands have limited land and water available for human habitation, water and food sources, and ecosystems that are vulnerable to inundation from sea-level rise. Here we demonstrate that sea-level rise will result in larger waves and higher wave-driven water levels along atoll islands' shorelines than at present. Numerical model results reveal waves will synergistically interact with sea-level rise, causing twice as much land forecast to be flooded for a given value of sea-level rise than currently predicted by current models that do not take wave-driven water levels into account. Atolls with islands close to the shallow reef crest are more likely to be subjected to greater wave-induced run-up and flooding due to sea-level rise than those with deeper reef crests farther from the islands' shorelines. It appears that many atoll islands will be flooded annually, salinizing the limited freshwater resources and thus likely forcing inhabitants to abandon their islands in decades, not centuries, as previously thought.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 40 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 124 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 3 2%
Malaysia 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 118 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 29 23%
Student > Master 29 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 16%
Student > Bachelor 9 7%
Professor 9 7%
Other 14 11%
Unknown 14 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 31 25%
Environmental Science 31 25%
Engineering 15 12%
Social Sciences 11 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 7%
Other 8 6%
Unknown 19 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 71. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2019.
All research outputs
#253,908
of 13,982,034 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#3,149
of 70,696 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,683
of 248,546 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#110
of 2,680 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,982,034 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 70,696 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,546 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2,680 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.