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A Video Surveillance System to Monitor Breeding Colonies of Common Terns (Sterna Hirundo)

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Visualized Experiments, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

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3 Mendeley
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Title
A Video Surveillance System to Monitor Breeding Colonies of Common Terns (<em>Sterna Hirundo</em>)
Published in
Journal of Visualized Experiments, July 2018
DOI 10.3791/57928
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jennifer Lynn Wall, Paul R. Marbán, David F. Brinker, Jeffery D. Sullivan, Mia Zimnik, Jennifer L. Murrow, Peter C. McGowan, Carl R. Callahan, Diann J. Prosser

Abstract

Many waterbird populations have faced declines over the last century, including the common tern (Sterna hirundo), a waterbird species with a widespread breeding distribution, that has been recently listed as endangered in some habitats of its range. Waterbird monitoring programs exist to track populations through time; however, some of the more intensive approaches require entering colonies and can be disruptive to nesting populations. This paper describes a protocol that utilizes a minimally invasive surveillance system to continuously monitor common tern nesting behavior in typical ground-nesting colonies. The video monitoring system utilizes wireless cameras focused on individual nests as well as over the colony as a whole, and allows for observation without entering the colony. The video system is powered with several 12 V car batteries that are continuously recharged using solar panels. Footage is recorded using a digital video recorder (DVR) connected to a hard drive, which can be replaced when full. The DVR may be placed outside of the colony to reduce disturbance. In this study, 3,624 h of footage recorded over 63 days in weather conditions ranging from 12.8 °C to 35.0 °C produced 3,006 h (83%) of usable behavioral data. The types of data retrieved from the recorded video can vary; we used it to detect external disturbances and measure nesting behavior during incubation. Although the protocol detailed here was designed for ground-nesting waterbirds, the principal system could easily be modified to accommodate alternative scenarios, such as colonial arboreal nesting species, making it widely applicable to a variety of research needs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 3 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 3 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 67%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 1 33%
Unspecified 1 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 133%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 August 2018.
All research outputs
#6,874,597
of 13,611,412 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Visualized Experiments
#1,533
of 6,299 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#107,223
of 267,894 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Visualized Experiments
#48
of 168 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,611,412 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,299 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 267,894 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 168 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.