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Body mass index modulates the relationship of sugar-sweetened beverage intake with serum urate concentrations and gout

Overview of attention for article published in Arthritis Research & Therapy, September 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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41 Mendeley
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Title
Body mass index modulates the relationship of sugar-sweetened beverage intake with serum urate concentrations and gout
Published in
Arthritis Research & Therapy, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13075-015-0781-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicola Dalbeth, Amanda Phipps-Green, Meaghan E. House, Gregory D. Gamble, Anne Horne, Lisa K. Stamp, Tony R. Merriman

Abstract

Both sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake and body mass index (BMI) are associated with elevated serum urate concentrations and gout risk. The aim of this study was to determine whether the associations of SSB intake with serum urate and gout are moderated by BMI. The effects of chronic SSB intake on serum urate and gout status were analysed in a large cross-sectional population study. The effects of an acute fructose load on serum urate and fractional excretion of uric acid (FEUA) were examined over 180 minutes in a short-term intervention study. In all analyses, the responses were compared in those with BMI <25 mg/kg(2) (low BMI) and ≥25 mg/kg(2) (high BMI). In the serum urate analysis (n = 12,870), chronic SSB intake was associated with increased serum urate in the high BMI group, but not in the low BMI group (P difference = 3.6 × 10(-3)). In the gout analysis (n = 2578), chronic high SSB intake was associated with gout in the high BMI group, but not in the low BMI group (P difference = 0.012). In the acute fructose loading study (n = 76), serum urate was increased in the high BMI group at baseline and throughout the observation period (PBMI group <0.0001), but there were similar acute serum urate increases in both BMI groups in response to the fructose load (P interaction = 0.99). The baseline FEUA was similar between the two BMI groups. However, following the fructose load, FEUA responses in the BMI groups differed (P interaction <0.0001), with increased FEUA at 120 minutes and 180 minutes in the low BMI group and reduced FEUA at 60 minutes in the high BMI group. These data suggest that BMI influences serum urate and gout risk in response to chronic SSB intake, and renal tubular uric acid handling in response to an acute fructose load. In addition to many other health benefits, avoidance of SSBs may be particularly important in those with overweight/obesity to prevent hyperuricaemia and reduce gout risk. Australian Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12610001036000 . Registered 24 November 2010.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
Unknown 40 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 20%
Unspecified 6 15%
Student > Master 6 15%
Researcher 4 10%
Other 8 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 24%
Unspecified 7 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 12%
Other 8 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 24 November 2015.
All research outputs
#3,578,406
of 12,451,992 outputs
Outputs from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#875
of 1,983 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#73,984
of 247,462 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Arthritis Research & Therapy
#23
of 49 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,451,992 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,983 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 247,462 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 49 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.