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Effects of weight loss intervention on body composition and blood pressure among overweight and obese women: findings from the MyBFF@home study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Women's Health, July 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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6 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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54 Mendeley
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Title
Effects of weight loss intervention on body composition and blood pressure among overweight and obese women: findings from the MyBFF@home study
Published in
BMC Women's Health, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12905-018-0592-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mansor Fazliana, Ahmad Zamri Liyana, Azahadi Omar, Rashidah Ambak, Noor Safiza Mohamad Nor, Ummi Kalthom Shamsudin, Narul Aida Salleh, Tahir Aris

Abstract

Obesity is related to the increased incidence of hypertension and in healthy individuals, blood pressure changes with age and body mass. The aims of this paper were to evaluate the effectiveness of the weight loss intervention on body composition and blood pressure, and to evaluate the relationship between these factors among housewives in the MyBFF@home study. MyBFF@home intervention was a quasi-experimental study which involved 328 overweight and obese housewives aged 18-59 years old (Control group: 159, Intervention group: 169). Data of the control and intervention group (pre and post intervention who completed the body composition and blood pressure measurements were analysed. Body compositions were measured using the Body Impedance Analyser (InBody 720) and blood pressure (Systolic and Diastolic) was taken using the blood pressure monitoring device (Omron HEM 907) at baseline, 6 month and 12 month. Data analyses (Pearson's correlation test and ANOVA) were performed and analysed using SPSS Statistics for Windows, version 22.0. Visceral fat area, fat mass and body fat percentage, were all significantly decreased in the intervention group compared to the control group after 6 month intervention (p < 0.05). Systolic blood pressure was reduced significantly by - 6.81 mmHg (95% CI: -9.72,-3.90; p < 0.01) in the intervention and by - 7.95 mmHg (95% CI: -11.69,-4.20; p < 0.01) in the control group after 6 month intervention. Diastolic blood pressure was significantly correlated with BMI (r = 0.19), waist circumference (r = 0.23), body fat mass (r = 0.22), body fat percentage (r = 0.18) visceral fat area (r = 0.22) and skeletal muscle mass (r = 0.14) with p < 0.05. At 12-month follow-up, no significant changes of blood pressure were detected in both groups. There were significant changes in the body fat and systolic blood pressure over 6 month among the participants in the intervention group compared to the control group. However, both groups were unable to sustain the positive changes in the body fats during the maintenance phase. There was a relationship between the body composition and blood pressure during the weight loss intervention and weight loss maintenance phase. Participation among obese housewives in a community-based intervention programme led to the improvements in blood pressure and body composition.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 17%
Student > Bachelor 9 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 9%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Researcher 4 7%
Other 8 15%
Unknown 15 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 14 26%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 17%
Sports and Recreations 5 9%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 7%
Computer Science 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 19 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 March 2020.
All research outputs
#4,864,049
of 16,046,105 outputs
Outputs from BMC Women's Health
#469
of 1,026 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#103,425
of 279,781 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Women's Health
#6
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,046,105 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 69th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,026 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 279,781 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.