↓ Skip to main content

General practice palliative care: patient and carer expectations, advance care plans and place of death—a systematic review

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care , July 2018
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#28 of 884)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
61 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
11 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
General practice palliative care: patient and carer expectations, advance care plans and place of death—a systematic review
Published in
BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care , July 2018
DOI 10.1136/bmjspcare-2018-001549
Pubmed ID
Authors

Claire E Johnson, Peta McVey, Joel Jin-On Rhee, Hugh Senior, Leanne Monterosso, Briony Williams, Julia Fallon-Ferguson, Matthew Grant, Harriet Nwachukwu, Michèle Aubin, Patsy Yates, Geoffrey Mitchell

Abstract

With an increasing ageing population in most countries, the role of general practitioners (GPs) and general practice nurses (GPNs) in providing optimal end of life (EoL) care is increasingly important. To explore: (1) patient and carer expectations of the role of GPs and GPNs at EoL; (2) GPs' and GPNs' contribution to advance care planning (ACP) and (3) if primary care involvement allows people to die in the place of preference. Systematic literature review. Papers from 2000 to 2017 were sought from Medline, Psychinfo, Embase, Joanna Briggs Institute and Cochrane databases. From 6209 journal articles, 51 papers were relevant. Patients and carers expect their GPs to be competent in all aspects of palliative care. They valued easy access to their GP, a multidisciplinary approach to care and well-coordinated and informed care. They also wanted their care team to communicate openly, honestly and empathically, particularly as the patient deteriorated. ACP and the involvement of GPs were important factors which contributed to patients being cared for and dying in their preferred place. There was no reference to GPNs in any paper identified. Patients and carers prefer a holistic approach to care. This review shows that GPs have an important role in ACP and that their involvement facilitates dying in the place of preference. Proactive identification of people approaching EoL is likely to improve all aspects of care, including planning and communicating about EoL. More work outlining the role of GPNs in end of life care is required.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 61 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 11 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 11 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 27%
Other 2 18%
Unspecified 2 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 18%
Student > Master 1 9%
Other 1 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 36%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 27%
Unspecified 3 27%
Psychology 1 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 42. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2018.
All research outputs
#335,353
of 12,225,951 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care
#28
of 884 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,885
of 253,260 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Supportive & Palliative Care
#2
of 33 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,225,951 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 884 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,260 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 33 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.