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A carbon nanotube optical rectenna

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Nanotechnology, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#49 of 2,414)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
23 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
15 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
13 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
45 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
177 Mendeley
Title
A carbon nanotube optical rectenna
Published in
Nature Nanotechnology, September 2015
DOI 10.1038/nnano.2015.220
Pubmed ID
Authors

Asha Sharma, Virendra Singh, Thomas L. Bougher, Baratunde A. Cola

Abstract

An optical rectenna-a device that directly converts free-propagating electromagnetic waves at optical frequencies to direct current-was first proposed over 40 years ago, yet this concept has not been demonstrated experimentally due to fabrication challenges at the nanoscale. Realizing an optical rectenna requires that an antenna be coupled to a diode that operates on the order of 1 pHz (switching speed on the order of 1 fs). Diodes operating at these frequencies are feasible if their capacitance is on the order of a few attofarads, but they remain extremely difficult to fabricate and to reliably couple to a nanoscale antenna. Here we demonstrate an optical rectenna by engineering metal-insulator-metal tunnel diodes, with a junction capacitance of ∼2 aF, at the tip of vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (∼10 nm in diameter), which act as the antenna. Upon irradiation with visible and infrared light, we measure a d.c. open-circuit voltage and a short-circuit current that appear to be due to a rectification process (we account for a very small but quantifiable contribution from thermal effects). In contrast to recent reports of photodetection based on hot electron decay in a plasmonic nanoscale antenna, a coherent optical antenna field appears to be rectified directly in our devices, consistent with rectenna theory. Finally, power rectification is observed under simulated solar illumination, and there is no detectable change in diode performance after numerous current-voltage scans between 5 and 77 °C, indicating a potential for robust operation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 177 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 3%
Belgium 2 1%
United Kingdom 2 1%
Spain 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Pakistan 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Other 1 <1%
Unknown 161 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 59 33%
Researcher 36 20%
Student > Master 32 18%
Student > Bachelor 15 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 5%
Other 27 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 66 37%
Physics and Astronomy 54 31%
Chemistry 23 13%
Materials Science 15 8%
Unspecified 8 5%
Other 11 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 205. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 October 2017.
All research outputs
#50,992
of 11,857,470 outputs
Outputs from Nature Nanotechnology
#49
of 2,414 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,708
of 244,412 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Nanotechnology
#1
of 78 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,857,470 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,414 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 30.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 244,412 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 78 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.