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Increased threat of tropical cyclones and coastal flooding to New York City during the anthropogenic era

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
39 news outlets
blogs
11 blogs
twitter
206 X users
facebook
26 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
85 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
207 Mendeley
Title
Increased threat of tropical cyclones and coastal flooding to New York City during the anthropogenic era
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, September 2015
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1513127112
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andra J. Reed, Michael E. Mann, Kerry A. Emanuel, Ning Lin, Benjamin P. Horton, Andrew C. Kemp, Jeffrey P. Donnelly

Abstract

In a changing climate, future inundation of the United States' Atlantic coast will depend on both storm surges during tropical cyclones and the rising relative sea levels on which those surges occur. However, the observational record of tropical cyclones in the North Atlantic basin is too short (A.D. 1851 to present) to accurately assess long-term trends in storm activity. To overcome this limitation, we use proxy sea level records, and downscale three CMIP5 models to generate large synthetic tropical cyclone data sets for the North Atlantic basin; driving climate conditions span from A.D. 850 to A.D. 2005. We compare pre-anthropogenic era (A.D. 850-1800) and anthropogenic era (A.D.1970-2005) storm surge model results for New York City, exposing links between increased rates of sea level rise and storm flood heights. We find that mean flood heights increased by ∼1.24 m (due mainly to sea level rise) from ∼A.D. 850 to the anthropogenic era, a result that is significant at the 99% confidence level. Additionally, changes in tropical cyclone characteristics have led to increases in the extremes of the types of storms that create the largest storm surges for New York City. As a result, flood risk has greatly increased for the region; for example, the 500-y return period for a ∼2.25-m flood height during the pre-anthropogenic era has decreased to ∼24.4 y in the anthropogenic era. Our results indicate the impacts of climate change on coastal inundation, and call for advanced risk management strategies.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 206 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 207 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 1%
Ireland 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Russia 1 <1%
Unknown 199 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 41 20%
Researcher 36 17%
Student > Master 24 12%
Student > Bachelor 14 7%
Other 12 6%
Other 40 19%
Unknown 40 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 59 29%
Environmental Science 30 14%
Engineering 29 14%
Social Sciences 9 4%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 2%
Other 22 11%
Unknown 53 26%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 526. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 January 2023.
All research outputs
#48,116
of 25,619,480 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#1,256
of 103,445 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#485
of 286,997 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#19
of 895 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,619,480 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 103,445 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 286,997 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 895 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.