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A global meta-analysis of the relative extent of intraspecific trait variation in plant communities

Overview of attention for article published in Ecology Letters, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (93rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
26 tweeters

Citations

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225 Dimensions

Readers on

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773 Mendeley
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Title
A global meta-analysis of the relative extent of intraspecific trait variation in plant communities
Published in
Ecology Letters, September 2015
DOI 10.1111/ele.12508
Pubmed ID
Authors

Andrew Siefert, Cyrille Violle, Loïc Chalmandrier, Cécile H. Albert, Adrien Taudiere, Alex Fajardo, Lonnie W. Aarssen, Christopher Baraloto, Marcos B. Carlucci, Marcus V. Cianciaruso, Vinícius de L. Dantas, Francesco de Bello, Leandro D. S. Duarte, Carlos R. Fonseca, Grégoire T. Freschet, Stéphanie Gaucherand, Nicolas Gross, Kouki Hikosaka, Benjamin Jackson, Vincent Jung, Chiho Kamiyama, Masatoshi Katabuchi, Steven W. Kembel, Emilie Kichenin, Nathan J. B. Kraft, Anna Lagerström, Yoann Le Bagousse-Pinguet, Yuanzhi Li, Norman Mason, Julie Messier, Tohru Nakashizuka, Jacob McC. Overton, Duane A. Peltzer, I. M. Pérez-Ramos, Valério D. Pillar, Honor C. Prentice, Sarah Richardson, Takehiro Sasaki, Brandon S. Schamp, Christian Schöb, Bill Shipley, Maja Sundqvist, Martin T. Sykes, Marie Vandewalle, David A. Wardle

Abstract

Recent studies have shown that accounting for intraspecific trait variation (ITV) may better address major questions in community ecology. However, a general picture of the relative extent of ITV compared to interspecific trait variation in plant communities is still missing. Here, we conducted a meta-analysis of the relative extent of ITV within and among plant communities worldwide, using a data set encompassing 629 communities (plots) and 36 functional traits. Overall, ITV accounted for 25% of the total trait variation within communities and 32% of the total trait variation among communities on average. The relative extent of ITV tended to be greater for whole-plant (e.g. plant height) vs. organ-level traits and for leaf chemical (e.g. leaf N and P concentration) vs. leaf morphological (e.g. leaf area and thickness) traits. The relative amount of ITV decreased with increasing species richness and spatial extent, but did not vary with plant growth form or climate. These results highlight global patterns in the relative importance of ITV in plant communities, providing practical guidelines for when researchers should include ITV in trait-based community and ecosystem studies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 26 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 773 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 15 2%
Brazil 6 <1%
Switzerland 3 <1%
Spain 3 <1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
France 2 <1%
Australia 2 <1%
Belgium 2 <1%
Portugal 2 <1%
Other 12 2%
Unknown 724 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 211 27%
Researcher 139 18%
Student > Master 124 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 59 8%
Unspecified 52 7%
Other 188 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 432 56%
Environmental Science 219 28%
Unspecified 86 11%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 23 3%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 <1%
Other 7 <1%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 June 2018.
All research outputs
#575,816
of 13,040,510 outputs
Outputs from Ecology Letters
#425
of 2,020 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,238
of 248,284 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Ecology Letters
#10
of 43 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,040,510 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,020 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 248,284 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 43 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.