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Tuberculosis in the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti

Overview of attention for article published in Bulletin of the World Health Organization, May 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
7 tweeters

Citations

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12 Dimensions

Readers on

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62 Mendeley
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Title
Tuberculosis in the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake in Haiti
Published in
Bulletin of the World Health Organization, May 2015
DOI 10.2471/blt.14.145649
Pubmed ID
Authors

Serena P Koenig, Vanessa Rouzier, Stalz Charles Vilbrun, Willy Morose, Sean E Collins, Patrice Joseph, Diessy Decome, Oksana Ocheretina, Stanislas Galbaud, Lauren Hashiguchi, Julma Pierrot, Jean William Pape

Abstract

In 2010, Haiti sustained a devastating earthquake that crippled the health-care infrastructure in the capital city, Port-au-Prince, and left 1.5 million people homeless. Subsequently, there was an increase in reported tuberculosis in the affected population. We conducted active tuberculosis case finding in a camp for internally displaced persons and a nearby slum. Community health workers screened for tuberculosis at the household level. People with persistent cough were referred to a physician. The National Tuberculosis Program continued its national tuberculosis reporting system. Even before the earthquake, Haiti had the highest tuberculosis incidence in the Americas. About half of the tuberculosis cases occur in the Port-au-Prince region. The number of reported tuberculosis cases in Haiti has increased after the earthquake, but data are too limited to determine if this is due to an increase in tuberculosis burden or to improved case detection. Compared to previous national estimates (230 per 100 000 population), undiagnosed tuberculosis was threefold higher in a camp for internally displaced persons (693 per 100 000) and fivefold higher in an urban slum (1165 per 100 000). With funding from the World Health Organization (WHO), active case finding is now being done systematically in slums and camps. Household-level screening for prolonged cough was effective in identifying patients with active tuberculosis in this study. Without accurate data, early detection of rising tuberculosis rates is challenging; data collection should be incorporated into pragmatic disease response programmes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 62 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 2 3%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 2%
Student > Master 1 2%
Unknown 58 94%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 2 3%
Social Sciences 1 2%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 2%
Unknown 58 94%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 July 2017.
All research outputs
#3,678,517
of 18,745,348 outputs
Outputs from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#1,208
of 4,051 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#55,868
of 259,063 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Bulletin of the World Health Organization
#8
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,745,348 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,051 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,063 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.