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Understanding the molecular basis of autism in a dish using hiPSCs-derived neurons from ASD patients

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Brain, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
6 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
127 Mendeley
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Title
Understanding the molecular basis of autism in a dish using hiPSCs-derived neurons from ASD patients
Published in
Molecular Brain, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13041-015-0146-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chae-Seok Lim, Jung-eun Yang, You-Kyung Lee, Kyungmin Lee, Jin-A Lee, Bong-Kiun Kaang

Abstract

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by deficits in social cognition, language development, and repetitive/restricted behaviors. Due to the complexity and heterogeneity of ASD and lack of a proper human cellular model system, the pathophysiological mechanism of ASD during the developmental process is largely unknown. However, recent progress in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology as well as in vitro neural differentiation techniques have allowed us to functionally characterize neurons and analyze cortical development during neural differentiation. These technical advances will increase our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of heterogeneous ASD and help identify molecular biomarkers for patient stratification as well as personalized medicine. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of iPSC generation, differentiation of specific neuronal subtypes from iPSCs, and phenotypic characterizations of human ASD patient-derived iPSC models. Finally, we discuss the current limitations of iPSC technology and future directions of ASD pathophysiology studies using iPSCs.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 6 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 127 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 125 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 26 20%
Researcher 23 18%
Student > Bachelor 19 15%
Student > Master 14 11%
Student > Postgraduate 9 7%
Other 26 20%
Unknown 10 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 20%
Neuroscience 25 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 18 14%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 13%
Psychology 11 9%
Other 18 14%
Unknown 14 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 July 2016.
All research outputs
#5,892,521
of 11,426,369 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Brain
#162
of 501 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#85,650
of 243,531 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Brain
#12
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,426,369 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 501 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 243,531 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.