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A novel locus of resistance to severe malaria in a region of ancient balancing selection

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
25 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
97 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
140 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
268 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
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Title
A novel locus of resistance to severe malaria in a region of ancient balancing selection
Published in
Nature, September 2015
DOI 10.1038/nature15390
Pubmed ID
Abstract

The high prevalence of sickle haemoglobin in Africa shows that malaria has been a major force for human evolutionary selection, but surprisingly few other polymorphisms have been proven to confer resistance to malaria in large epidemiological studies. To address this problem, we conducted a multi-centre genome-wide association study (GWAS) of life-threatening Plasmodium falciparum infection (severe malaria) in over 11,000 African children, with replication data in a further 14,000 individuals. Here we report a novel malaria resistance locus close to a cluster of genes encoding glycophorins that are receptors for erythrocyte invasion by P. falciparum. We identify a haplotype at this locus that provides 33% protection against severe malaria (odds ratio = 0.67, 95% confidence interval = 0.60-0.76, P value = 9.5 × 10(-11)) and is linked to polymorphisms that have previously been shown to have features of ancient balancing selection, on the basis of haplotype sharing between humans and chimpanzees. Taken together with previous observations on the malaria-protective role of blood group O, these data reveal that two of the strongest GWAS signals for severe malaria lie in or close to genes encoding the glycosylated surface coat of the erythrocyte cell membrane, both within regions of the genome where it appears that evolution has maintained diversity for millions of years. These findings provide new insights into the host-parasite interactions that are critical in determining the outcome of malaria infection.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 97 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 268 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Israel 1 <1%
Ghana 1 <1%
Tanzania, United Republic of 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
China 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 255 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 64 24%
Researcher 50 19%
Student > Master 33 12%
Student > Bachelor 27 10%
Professor 15 6%
Other 57 21%
Unknown 22 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 98 37%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 80 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 28 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 8 3%
Computer Science 5 2%
Other 21 8%
Unknown 28 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 285. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 September 2020.
All research outputs
#76,116
of 19,398,511 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#6,555
of 83,876 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,191
of 259,827 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#199
of 1,030 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,398,511 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 83,876 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 94.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,827 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,030 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.