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Characteristics of young people with long term conditions close to transfer to adult health services

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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114 Mendeley
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Title
Characteristics of young people with long term conditions close to transfer to adult health services
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12913-015-1095-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hannah Merrick, Helen McConachie, Ann Le Couteur, Kay Mann, Jeremy R. Parr, Mark S. Pearce, Allan Colver

Abstract

For many young people with long term conditions (LTC), transferring from paediatric to adult health services can be difficult and outcomes are often reported to be poor. We report the characteristics and representativeness of three groups of young people with LTCs as they approach transfer to adult services: those with autism spectrum disorder with additional mental health problems (ASD); cerebral palsy (CP); or diabetes. Young people aged 14 years-18 years 11 months with ASD, or those with diabetes were identified from children's services and those with CP from population databases. Questionnaires, completed by the young person and a parent, included the 'Mind the Gap' Scale, the Rotterdam Transition Profile, and the Warwick and Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale. Three hundred seventy four young people joined the study; 118 with ASD, 106 with CP, and 150 with diabetes. Participants had a significant (p < 0.001) but not substantial difference in socio-economic status (less deprived) compared to those who declined to take part or did not respond. Condition-specific severity of participants was similar to that of population data. Satisfaction with services was good as the 'gap' scores (the difference between their ideal and current care) reported by parents and young people were small. Parents' satisfaction was significantly lower than their children's (p < 0.001). On every domain of the Rotterdam Transition Profile, except for education and employment, significant differences were found between the three groups. A larger proportion of young people with diabetes were in a more independent phase of participation than those with ASD or CP. The wellbeing scores of those with diabetes (median = 53, IQR: 47-58) and CP (median = 53, IQR: 48-60) were similar, and significantly higher than for those with ASD (median = 47, IQR: 41-52; p < 0.001). Having established that our sample of young people with one of three LTCs recruited close to transfer to adult services was representative, we have described aspects of their satisfaction with services, participation and wellbeing, noting similarities and differences by LTC. This information about levels of current functioning is important for subsequent evaluation of the impact of service features on the health and wellbeing of young people with LTCs following transfer from child services to adult services.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 114 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 114 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 18 16%
Researcher 18 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 10 9%
Student > Bachelor 9 8%
Other 25 22%
Unknown 20 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 19 17%
Psychology 16 14%
Social Sciences 13 11%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 3%
Other 5 4%
Unknown 31 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 October 2015.
All research outputs
#1,474,918
of 6,504,996 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#898
of 2,593 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#62,016
of 203,458 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#28
of 132 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,504,996 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 77th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,593 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 64% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 203,458 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 132 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.