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Potential estrogenic effects of wastewaters on gene expression inPimephales promelasand fish assemblages in streams of southeastern New York

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, October 2015
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2 tweeters

Citations

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11 Dimensions

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29 Mendeley
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Title
Potential estrogenic effects of wastewaters on gene expression inPimephales promelasand fish assemblages in streams of southeastern New York
Published in
Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, October 2015
DOI 10.1002/etc.3120
Pubmed ID
Authors

Barry P. Baldigo, Scott D. George, Patrick J. Phillips, Jocelyn D.C. Hemming, Nancy D. Denslow, Kevin J. Kroll

Abstract

Direct linkages between endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) from municipal and industrial wastewaters and impacts on wild fish assemblages are rare. The levels of plasma vitellogenin (Vtg) and Vtg mRNA in male fathead minnows Pimephales promelas (FHMs) exposed to wastewater effluents and dilutions of 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), estrogen activity, and fish assemblages in 10 receiving streams were assessed to improve our understanding of important interrelations. Results from 4-d laboratory assays indicate that EE2, plasma Vtg concentration and Vtg-gene expression in FHMs, and 17β-estradiol equivalents (E2Eq) were highly related to each other (R(2 ) = 0.98 to 1.00). Concentrations of E2Eq in most effluents did not exceed 2.0 ng/L, which was possibly a short-term exposure threshold for Vtg-gene expression in male FHMs. Plasma Vtg in FHMs only increased significantly (up to 1136 µg/mL) in two wastewater effluents. Fish assemblages were generally unaffected at 8 of 10 study sites, yet the density and biomass of 79% to 89% of species populations were reduced (63 to 68% were reduced significantly) in the downstream reach of one receiving stream. These results, and moderate to high E2Eq concentrations (up to 16.1 ng/L) observed in effluents during a companion study, suggest that estrogenic wastewaters can potentially affect individual fish, their populations, and entire fish communities in comparable systems across New York. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 8 28%
Researcher 6 21%
Student > Bachelor 6 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 17%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 7%
Other 2 7%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 11 38%
Environmental Science 6 21%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 10%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 7%
Engineering 2 7%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 2 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 December 2015.
All research outputs
#10,262,233
of 13,453,331 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#2,894
of 3,896 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#156,145
of 250,349 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#53
of 90 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,453,331 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,896 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.5. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 250,349 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 90 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.