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Effects of sex on response of the bovine preimplantation embryo to insulin-like growth factor 1, activin A, and WNT7A

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Developmental Biology, July 2018
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Title
Effects of sex on response of the bovine preimplantation embryo to insulin-like growth factor 1, activin A, and WNT7A
Published in
BMC Developmental Biology, July 2018
DOI 10.1186/s12861-018-0176-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paula Tríbulo, Gulnur Jumatayeva, Khoboso Lehloenya, James I. Moss, Veronica M. Negrón-Pérez, Peter J. Hansen

Abstract

Alterations in maternal environment can sometimes affect embryonic development in a sexually-dimorphic manner. The objective was to determine whether preimplantation bovine embryos respond to three maternally-derived cell signaling molecules in a sex-dependent manner. Actions of three embryokines known to increase competence of bovine embryos to develop to the blastocyst stage, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), activin A, and WNT member 7A (WNT7A), were evaluated for actions on embryos produced in vitro with X- or Y- sorted semen from the same bull. Each embryokine was tested in embryos produced by in vitro fertilization of groups of oocytes with either pooled sperm from two bulls or with sperm from individual bulls. Embryos were treated with IGF1, activin A, or WNT7A on day 5 of culture. All three embryokines increased the proportion of cleaved zygotes that developed to the blastocyst stage and the effect was similar for female and male embryos. As an additional test of sexual dimorphism, effects of IGF1 on blastocyst expression of a total of 127 genes were determined by RT-qPCR using the Fluidigm Delta Gene assay. Expression of 18 genes was affected by sex, expression of 4 genes was affected by IGF1 and expression of 3 genes was affected by the IGF1 by sex interaction. Sex did not alter how IGF1, activin A or WNT7A altered developmental competence to the blastocyst stage. Thus, sex-dependent differences in regulation of developmental competence of embryos by maternal regulatory signals is not a general phenomenon. The fact that sex altered how IGF1 regulates gene expression is indicative that there could be sexual dimorphism in embryokine regulation of some aspects of embryonic function other than developmental potential to become a blastocyst.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 15 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 15 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 27%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 1 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 7%
Student > Master 1 7%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 4 27%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 53%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 13%
Unknown 5 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 July 2018.
All research outputs
#11,804,857
of 13,304,005 outputs
Outputs from BMC Developmental Biology
#272
of 306 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#232,263
of 268,288 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Developmental Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
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