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Effects of Zinc Magnesium Aspartate (ZMA) Supplementation on Training Adaptations and Markers of Anabolism and Catabolism

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, December 2004
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

news
6 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
64 tweeters
patent
2 patents
facebook
13 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
1 Google+ user
video
7 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
105 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Effects of Zinc Magnesium Aspartate (ZMA) Supplementation on Training Adaptations and Markers of Anabolism and Catabolism
Published in
Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, December 2004
DOI 10.1186/1550-2783-1-2-12
Pubmed ID
Authors

Colin D Wilborn, Chad M Kerksick, Bill I Campbell, Lem W Taylor, Brandon M Marcello, Christopher J Rasmussen, Mike C Greenwood, Anthony Almada, Richard B Kreider

Abstract

This study examined whether supplementing the diet with a commercial supplement containing zinc magnesium aspartate (ZMA) during training affects zinc and magnesium status, anabolic and catabolic hormone profiles, and/or training adaptations. Forty-two resistance trained males (27 +/- 9 yrs; 178 +/- 8 cm, 85 +/- 15 kg, 18.6 +/- 6% body fat) were matched according to fat free mass and randomly assigned to ingest in a double blind manner either a dextrose placebo (P) or ZMA 30-60 minutes prior to going to sleep during 8-weeks of standardized resistance-training. Subjects completed testing sessions at 0, 4, and 8 weeks that included body composition assessment as determined by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry, 1-RM and muscular endurance tests on the bench and leg press, a Wingate anaerobic power test, and blood analysis to assess anabolic/catabolic status as well as markers of health. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Results indicated that ZMA supplementation non-significantly increased serum zinc levels by 11 - 17% (p = 0.12). However, no significant differences were observed between groups in anabolic or catabolic hormone status, body composition, 1-RM bench press and leg press, upper or lower body muscular endurance, or cycling anaerobic capacity. Results indicate that ZMA supplementation during training does not appear to enhance training adaptations in resistance trained populations.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 64 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 105 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 2 2%
Brazil 1 <1%
Ukraine 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Unknown 100 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 25 24%
Student > Master 21 20%
Other 12 11%
Researcher 12 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 6%
Other 29 28%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 27 26%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 18 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 8%
Social Sciences 7 7%
Other 23 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 119. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 September 2019.
All research outputs
#133,533
of 13,759,027 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#66
of 693 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#522
of 87,662 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition
#2
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,759,027 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 693 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 47.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 87,662 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.