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Development of a framework for genotyping bovine-derived Cryptosporidium parvum, using a multilocus fragment typing tool

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, October 2015
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Title
Development of a framework for genotyping bovine-derived Cryptosporidium parvum, using a multilocus fragment typing tool
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, October 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13071-015-1107-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emily J. Hotchkiss, Janice A. Gilray, Marnie L. Brennan, Robert M. Christley, Liam J. Morrison, Nicholas N. Jonsson, Elizabeth A. Innes, Frank Katzer

Abstract

There is a need for an integrated genotyping approach for C. parvum; no sufficiently discriminatory scheme to date has been fully validated or widely adopted by veterinary or public health researchers. Multilocus fragment typing (MLFT) can provide good differentiation and is relatively quick and cheap to perform. A MLFT tool was assessed in terms of its typeability, specificity, precision (repeatability and reproducibility), accuracy and ability to genotypically discriminate bovine-derived Cryptosporidium parvum. With the aim of working towards a consensus, six markers were selected for inclusion based on their successful application in previous studies: MM5, MM18, MM19, TP14, MS1 and MS9. Alleles were assigned according to the fragment sizes of repeat regions amplified, as determined by capillary electrophoresis. In addition, a region of the GP60 gene was amplified and sequenced to determine gp60 subtype and this was added to the allelic profiles of the 6 markers to determine the multilocus genotype (MLG). The MLFT tool was applied to 140 C. parvum samples collected in two cross-sectional studies of UK calves, conducted in Cheshire in 2004 (principally dairy animals) and Aberdeenshire/Caithness in 2011 (beef animals). Typeability was 84 %. The primers did not amplify tested non-parvum species frequently detected in cattle. In terms of repeatability, within- and between-run fragment sizes showed little variability. Between laboratories, fragment sizes differed but allele calling was reproducible. The MLFT had good discriminatory ability (Simpson's Index of Diversity, SID, was 0.92), compared to gp60 sequencing alone (SID 0.44). Some markers were more informative than others, with MS1 and MS9 proving monoallelic in tested samples. Further inter-laboratory trials are now warranted with the inclusion of human-derived C. parvum samples, allowing progress towards an integrated, standardised typing scheme to enable source attribution and to determine the role of livestock in future outbreaks of human C. parvum.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 30%
Lecturer 2 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 10%
Student > Master 2 10%
Student > Bachelor 1 5%
Other 3 15%
Unknown 4 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 25%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 15%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 10%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 5 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 June 2016.
All research outputs
#4,158,100
of 7,926,939 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,253
of 2,203 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#124,820
of 239,381 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#101
of 161 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 7,926,939 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,203 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 161 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.