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Sharing news of a lung cancer diagnosis with adult family members and friends: a qualitative study to inform a supportive intervention

Overview of attention for article published in Patient Education & Counseling, March 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
30 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
12 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
31 Mendeley
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Title
Sharing news of a lung cancer diagnosis with adult family members and friends: a qualitative study to inform a supportive intervention
Published in
Patient Education & Counseling, March 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.pec.2015.09.013
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gail Ewing, Nothando Ngwenya, John Benson, David Gilligan, Susan Bailey, Jane Seymour, Morag Farquhar

Abstract

Extensive research exists on breaking bad news by clinicians. This study examines perspectives of patients and those accompanying them at diagnosis-giving of subsequently sharing news of lung cancer with adult family/friends, and views of healthcare professionals, to inform development of a supportive intervention. Qualitative interviews with 20 patients, 17 accompanying persons; focus groups and interviews with 27 healthcare professionals from four Thoracic Oncology Units. Intervention development workshops with 24 healthcare professionals and six service users with experience of sharing a cancer diagnosis. Framework thematic analysis. Patients and accompanying persons shared news of lung cancer whilst coming to terms with the diagnosis. They recalled general support from healthcare professionals but not support with sharing bad news. Six elements were identified providing a framework for a potential intervention: 1-people to be told, 2-information to be shared, 3-timing of sharing, 4-responsibility for sharing, 5-methods of telling others and 6-reactions of those told. This study identifies the challenge of sharing bad news and a potential framework to guide delivery of a supportive intervention tailored to individual needs of patients. The identified framework could extend the portfolio of guidance on communication in cancer and potentially in other life-limiting conditions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 30 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 9 29%
Unspecified 8 26%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 16%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Other 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 32%
Unspecified 7 23%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 23%
Psychology 3 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 3%
Other 3 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 October 2019.
All research outputs
#910,425
of 13,777,258 outputs
Outputs from Patient Education & Counseling
#132
of 2,679 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,541
of 251,482 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Patient Education & Counseling
#4
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,777,258 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,679 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 251,482 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.