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Aerobic and strength exercises for youngsters aged 12 to 15: what do parents think?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, September 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
42 tweeters

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
70 Mendeley
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Title
Aerobic and strength exercises for youngsters aged 12 to 15: what do parents think?
Published in
BMC Public Health, September 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12889-015-2328-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gill A. ten Hoor, Ester F. C. Sleddens, Stef P. J. Kremers, Annemie M. W. J. Schols, Gerjo Kok, Guy Plasqui

Abstract

Although strength exercises evidently have both physiological and psychological health benefits across all ages, they are erroneously considered to adversely affect health status in youngsters. The aim of this study was to examine parental attitudes towards their child's physical activity in general, as well as aerobic and strength exercises in particular. In total, 314 parents from an online panel representative of the Dutch population completed an online survey about their own physical activity and that of their child (12-15 years old). The study also explored reasons for non-participation, and attitudes about the parents' own and their child's physical activity level. Parents consistently reported a positive attitude towards aerobic exercises, but a less positive attitude regarding strength exercises. Parents were more likely to indicate that their child was not allowed to participate in strength exercises (29.6 %) than aerobic exercises (4.0 %). They thought that strength exercises could interfere with optimal physical development. This study consistently shows that parents have a positive attitude towards aerobic exercises, but a less positive attitude regarding strength exercises. We suggest testing interventions to increase parental understanding of the advantages of and possibilities for (e.g., facilities) strength training on their child's health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 42 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 70 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 24%
Student > Bachelor 12 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 10%
Student > Postgraduate 4 6%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 13 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 20 29%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 14%
Social Sciences 8 11%
Psychology 5 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 4%
Other 10 14%
Unknown 14 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 49. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 November 2018.
All research outputs
#477,189
of 16,275,174 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#437
of 11,185 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,383
of 254,640 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,275,174 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,185 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 254,640 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them