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Use of terrestrial field studies in the derivation of bioaccumulation potential of chemicals

Overview of attention for article published in Integrated Environmental Assessment & Management, December 2015
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (70th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

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5 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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27 Mendeley
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Title
Use of terrestrial field studies in the derivation of bioaccumulation potential of chemicals
Published in
Integrated Environmental Assessment & Management, December 2015
DOI 10.1002/ieam.1717
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nico W van den Brink, Jennifer A Arblaster, Sarah R Bowman, Jason M Conder, John E Elliott, Mark S Johnson, Derek CG Muir, Tiago Natal-da-Luz, Barnett A Rattner, Bradley E Sample, Richard F Shore

Abstract

Field-based studies are an essential component of research addressing the behavior of organic chemicals, and a unique line of evidence that can be used to assess bioaccumulation potential in chemical registration programs and aid in development of associated laboratory and modeling efforts. To aid scientific and regulatory discourse on the application of terrestrial field data in this manner, this paper provides practical recommendations regarding the generation and interpretation of terrestrial field data. Currently, Biota-to-Soil-Accumulation Factors (BSAFs), Biomagnification Factors (BMFs), and Bioaccumulation Factors (BAFs) are the most suitable bioaccumulation metrics that are applicable to bioaccumulation assessment evaluations and able to be generated from terrestrial field studies with relatively low uncertainty. BMFs calculated from field-collected samples of terrestrial carnivores and their prey appear to be particularly robust indicators of bioaccumulation potential. The use of stable isotope ratios for quantification of trophic relationships in terrestrial ecosystems needs to be further developed to resolve uncertainties associated with the calculation of terrestrial Trophic Magnification Factors (TMFs). Sampling efforts for terrestrial field studies should strive for efficiency, and advice on optimization of study sample sizes, practical considerations for obtaining samples, selection of tissues for analysis, and data interpretation is provided. Although there is still much to be learned regarding terrestrial bioaccumulation, these recommendations provide some initial guidance to the present application of terrestrial field data as a line of evidence in the assessment of chemical bioaccumulation potential and a resource to inform laboratory and modelling efforts. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 2 7%
United States 1 4%
Iran, Islamic Republic of 1 4%
Unknown 23 85%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 33%
Unspecified 5 19%
Student > Master 4 15%
Researcher 3 11%
Other 3 11%
Other 3 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 9 33%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 26%
Unspecified 5 19%
Chemistry 2 7%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 1 4%
Other 3 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 March 2016.
All research outputs
#3,501,712
of 12,486,089 outputs
Outputs from Integrated Environmental Assessment & Management
#80
of 532 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,935
of 249,947 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Integrated Environmental Assessment & Management
#3
of 32 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,486,089 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 532 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 249,947 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 32 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.