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Night-time blood pressure and target organ damage

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Hypertension, November 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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18 Dimensions

Readers on

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31 Mendeley
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Title
Night-time blood pressure and target organ damage
Published in
Journal of Hypertension, November 2015
DOI 10.1097/hjh.0000000000000690
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anne Marie O’Flynn, Eamon Dolan, Ronan J. Curtin, Eoin O’Brien, Ivan J. Perry, Patricia M. Kearney

Abstract

The prognostic significance of abnormal circadian blood pressure (BP) patterns is well established. Research to date has focused on both nocturnal dipping and absolute night-time BP levels; however, which of these variables should be the primary target for therapy remains unclear. The aim of this study is to determine whether dipping status or absolute night-time BP levels have a stronger association with subclinical target organ damage (TOD). The Mitchelstown Cohort was established to examine cardiovascular health in an adult population sample recruited from primary care. Night-time BP was categorized by dipping status. Subclinical TOD was defined as Cornell Product left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) voltage criteria on ECG and urine albumin : creatinine ratio (ACR) at least 1.1 mg/mmol. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between night-time BP and TOD. Of 2047 participants, 1207 (response rate 59%), underwent 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring. We excluded 161 studies due to incomplete data. Of 1046 participants, 178 (17%) had evidence of TOD. Each 10-mmHg rise in night-time SBP increased the odds of TOD. Odds ratio (OR) ACR at least 1.1 mg/mmol 1.5 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.2-1.8] and OR LVH 1.4 (95% CI 1.1-1.8). Absolute BP level rather than dipping status may be a superior early marker of risk associated with night-time BP. Interventional studies are required to determine whether there is a benefit in specifically targeting absolute night-time BP levels to prevent clinically important outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 31 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 5 16%
Researcher 5 16%
Professor 3 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Other 9 29%
Unknown 3 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 42%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Psychology 2 6%
Computer Science 1 3%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 6 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 November 2015.
All research outputs
#6,686,051
of 12,366,438 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Hypertension
#1,423
of 3,608 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#99,101
of 253,798 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Hypertension
#20
of 95 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,366,438 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,608 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,798 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 95 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.